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Archive for the ‘Prevention’ Category

The Burns Hill Neighborhood Watch Association has taken the initiative making their community a safer place for families raising  children and the elder population and improve the quality of life. A Commitment to Community Award Dinner recognized outstanding members and noted “all” were deserving of the awards.

 

The president, Jerry C. Mingo was very appreciative of all community members taking action to ensure a neighborhood, safe to come home to.

Even Boy Scout Troup 6 participated.

Pastor, Annie Baker, Chaplin said a few words and song.

We had live entertainment from Brenda Bey-Vocal Xpressions, just beautiful.

Angela Howard-Health Coach of Take Shape for Life was a sponsor, member of Burns Hill and Mistress of Ceremony.

Awards were given out for

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Good Neighbor Award
  • Unsung Hero Award

One of the sponsors of the evening- Call on Red, computer repair.

Centerpieces were green and “Green”, created by

Subjects Discussed were

  • Children’s curfew
  • Slumlords -homes not boarded up properly, contributing to other issues
  • Promiscuous behavior
  • Selling of illegal substances
  • America’s Night Out Against Crime
  • Cleaning up the neighborhood
  • Community gardening

Pride and taking ownership and responsibility was noted,  the building blocks of strong community.  Burns Hill Community Neighborhood is working together with local representatives, moving mountains for the good of the people.  What if all neighborhoods acted ?

Great Job Burns Hill!

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North Carolina is ranked among the highest in the nation regarding obesity, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. In general, states in the West and New England rank lowest in the fattest states rankings, while states in the South and the Rust Belt tend to rank highest. 57% of North Carolina adults are overweight or obese.

Some factors causing weight gain and obesity are

  • Lack of energy balance
  • Pregnancy
  • Emotional
  • Inactive Lifestyle
  • Environment
  • Health conditions
  • Family genes
  • Medicines
  • Smoking
  • Age
  • Lack of Sleep to name a few

Could we, as North Carolinians change those statistics?

Let’s Fight the Fat Stat and Learn to Live Lean and Mean with our local resources (and they are not difficult to find)

Angela Howard-Health Coach with Take Shape for Life addresses  issues on an individual basis. Her motto, “There is no 1 solution to weight loss, it is a combination.” Angela has personally lost 212 pounds and works with clients who desire loosing 2-5 pounds per week, taking the healthy route.

Below is a picture of Angela and her husband, both at least 200 pounds over-weight. An unfortunate reality was the diagnosis of early onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, motivating her decision to change her life.

Angela provides workshops regarding health and wellness

What foods to select, how to prepare, are supplements needed, exercise implementation or other activities to improve quality of life are all examined. It is a known fact, people trying to lose weight with the help of a coach or another trained health professional, do so faster and also keep the weight off. They act as your support system while you walk the journey to a healthier lifestyle. Angela can be reached for questions at, 336.301.9321. Fight the Fat!

If you have been declined for health insurance, or feel you may not be accepted, there are other alternatives, call Melody Anderson of Chadwick Insurance Group, LLC for assistance. There is no charge for consultations.

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Celebrate Mother Earth with “Green” Solutions-SE Guilford
Free Event for Families to Increase “Living with Awareness”
Hosted by Just a Cloud Away, Inc.™ Journal, BNI “Diamonds” Chapter and Divine Weddings and Beyond
Saturday April 16th-3pm 2011 at Wildflower Walk in Liberty, NC
2652 NC Highway 62 East

Teaching our children at a young age may have a positive impact on future generations. Please come and enjoy an afternoon with nature and leave with a new appreciation for the treasures of the Earth and insights on local companies sharing the same passion

Activities will include-

  • $2 golf cart rides through the forest and hayrides
  • Visiting friendly goats, horses, miniature horse, rabbit, and donkey
  • Rescues will have dogs on site for adoption
  • Workshop for newly engaged couples, event planners, wedding venues, desiring “Green” centerpieces to be given away as gifts or reused within landscapes
  • Plant Swap. Some plants to be exchanged include, verbena, black mondo grass, mazus, yarrow, columbine, st johns wort, crape myrtle tree, golden raintree, helleborus, rose of sharon, daylily, monkey grass, roses, raydon’s favorite aster’s, siberian iris, plumbago, german iris, sweet pea vine, and so much more
  • Meditative walk with Holistic Healer, Janet Nestor through the woods and farm, also providing on site energy work
  • Local authors signing published books
  • Mowable cemetery groundcovers to personalize  monuments of loved ones.
  • Bring $$$ to take treasures home
  • Come and meet our Julian Fire Department too

 

Local vendors will provide information on healthy eating, eco-tourism, eco-friendly products, and more. Children who bring recycled bottles will receive a free gift

Registration is required ensuring safety

Registration- name,  telephone number, email, number of people attending, by emailing Christiana at cdyson83@yahoo.com

Interested vendors, please contact Diana(@) justacloudaway.com for more information and your logos will be posted

Event Sponsors and Vendors

       

  

 

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 Alzheimer’s Disease is on the rise with someone being diagnosed every 70 seconds. Families are choosing to keep loved ones at home, hiring in home care agencies to help or

choosing a reputable facility specializing in Alzheimer Care.

One of the top Alzheimer Care facilities in the Buffalo, NY area is Harris Hill Nursing Facility, not because of one of my family members resides here, but the various activities, parties and projects offered.

For Alzheimer patients who are aware of their surroundings and have the desire to feel needed, activities are crucial on a daily basis.

Activities range from tactile (papercrafting, repetitive projects), audio (singing, listening to story-telling or music), physical (gardening or house keeping). Depending on the patients level of function, there is an activity for them, even if for only a few minutes per day.

 

When I visit Harris Hill, one particular woman with Alzheimer’s Disease is always carrying her baby doll in her arms being so attentive with such love in her eyes.

 

The parties and events are long processes with staff moving very slow. It is not the destination it is the journey. High strung people like myself have to slow down and enjoy the talk, dance and smiles of the residents who think they have known you all of their lives.

 

Find out what kind of activities are offered when you are selecting your loved ones new home. The disease may bring out new personality traits and hidden talents, which are just a moment away of being revealed to you.

Alzheimer’s Disease facilities in the Piedmont Triad Area can schedule gardening activities with Diana Digs Dirt

of papercrafting projects with Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal

We are looking for a monthly papercrafting location in the Greensboro, NC for a workshop to meet on the 3rd Friday of the month from 5-11PM. This would be added exposure for your facility where workshops will be photographed and posted on Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal’s Blog. The workshops will reach out to community members wanting to learn how to compose keepsakes of loved ones, pets or baby’s gone too soon in the form of journal books, scrapbooks, collages, cards and more.

Email- Diana (@) justacloudaway.com to schedule activities

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February is Heartworm Prevention month –

Holistic pet care for your furry Valentines!

by Terry Rader  

Each February when we celebrate those dearest to our hearts, why not remember our four-legged companions with a gift of perfect health on Valentine’s Day? Include an annual Wellpet Exam each February along with a heartworm test. Here, in the South, where mosquitoes are abundant, protecting our pets from heartworm disease is necessary.

Heartworm prevention requires a strong, healthy immune system – this begins with proper diet. Look for holistic, wholesome pet foods with nutritious ingredients that list the meat as the first ingredient, not “meat-by-products” or “meal”. Dogs and cats are carnivores and their digestive systems do much better with real meat and veggies rather than a lot of grain. It is also a good practice to alternate the meats (chicken, lamb, fish) every few months so that your pets do not develop sensitivities to the same foods.

 

If your present veterinarian is not up on holistic alternatives, you may want to add a holistic veterinarian to your pet’s wellness team. I have worked with allopathic and holistic vets together since 1994. Calling your holistic vet for alternatives can often save your companion from unnecessary vaccinations and medications with side effects. There are also many herbal remedies and supplements to further strengthen your pet’s immunity to disease.

 

 

Victoria Farthing, DVM at Animal Wellness Center at Concord Farm in Virginia says: Interceptor® is safer for many dogs with different ailments including epileptics, a lot more dogs are getting on it, plus it aids in whipworm eradication. Heartguard® only treats roundworms and hookworms. Real natural prevention includes additional protection from mosquitoes using topical treatments of Neem oil and specific essential oils in safe dilutions (some essential oils can burn the skin and should not be used at all).”

 

In summary, your choices for Heartworm Prevention include:

1) Holistic prevention (not yet proven by itself)

2) Interceptor® (give every 6 weeks instead of monthly)

3) Heartgard® (contains Ivermectin, very toxic to Aussies/Collies)

4) Vaccination (I avoid all unnecessary vaccinations, see http://www.charlesloopsdvm.com/vaccinations.html)

 

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: This information is not meant to replace professional veterinary prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a holistic veterinarian before following any new holistic treatment for your beloved pets. Find one in your area at http://www.ahvma.org/

 

Terry Rader is a Writer, Wellness Herbalist/Consultant and Flower Essences Practitioner, working with dogs (especially seniors & chronic immune disease) since 1994, see http://www.doedreamers.com/kayla.html

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Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of demetia in people 65 years and older and every 70 seconds, someone is diagnosed with the disease. 5.3 million American’s and their families are touched by Alzheimer’s Disease.

1. Dark Chocolate

  • Brain Food Facts:Studies carried out by Norwegian researchers found that the flavonoids in cocoa increase blood flow to the brain and may help to protect against conditions with reduced cerebral blood flow like dementia and stroke. To get the most benefits, buy chocolates with low sugar but high cocoa content (70% or more is the best like these 80% organic extra dark chocolates from Vital Choice).However, while cocoa is rich in beneficial compounds, it’s also high in saturated fats. Many times, it’s also paired with high-fat ingredients like full cream in desserts. So it’s best to keep dark chocolate to a small once-a-week treat.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Flavonoids can be found in practically all fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices. A good rule of thumb is that the more colorful a fruit or vegetable is, the higher the levels of flavonoids. Some flavonoid-rich foods that have been studied intensively include red wine, green tea and cherries which will be discussed in detail below.

2. Red Wine

  • Brain Food Facts:The same Norwegian study on dark chocolate also credited modest wine drinking for conferring protective effect on cognitive function and decreasing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. This is due to the high levels of flavonoids and possibly other polyphenolics such as resveratrol that are presence in red wine.However, alcohol is a double-edged sword that should be used with caution. Because, ironically, many studies have also found that excessive alcohol intake can lead to dementia as well as a host of other serious health conditions such as cancer by triggering chronic inflammation. So if you do drink, limit yourself to no more than one glass a day.It’s also important to note that in the first few hours after drinking wine, alcohol may actually slow thinking and interfere with the memory temporarily. If you’re preparing for an important test or going to sit for an examination, drinking wine is probably not the way to boost your performance.Alternative Foods for the Brain:

    Green tea is rich in a type of flavonoid known as catechins which can reach as high as 1 gram in a single cup. Numerous studies have attest to the health beneficial properties of green tea including its ability to cut the risk of cancer as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Its ability to keep weight in check also makes green tea a popular choice in many health promoting diets.

3. Clam

  • Brain Food Facts:Researchers in the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Aging (OPTIMA) found that elderly adults with low vitamin B12 levels had more than four times the usual risk of Alzheimer’s. It’s thought that when vitamin B12 levels are low, blood levels of homocysteine will raise, significantly increasing the risk for dementia, heart attack ad other ailments. To get a healthy dose of vitamin B12, look no further than clams. This shellfish packs a whopping 98.9mcg of vitamin B12 in just 100g serving, or 1648% of the RDA.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Rich sources of vitamin B12 are found in seafood and animal sources including oysters, mussels, fish, shrimps, scallops, liver of most animals and beef. Lower levels of vitamin B12 can also be found in seaweeds, yeasts and fermented foods like miso and tempeh.

4. Asparagus

  • Brain Food Facts:A Korean study published in 2008 found that individuals who were folate deficient were 3.5 times more likely to develop dementia. What’s more surprising is that those who were not folate deficient but had low folate measures were also at significantly increased dementia risk. To make sure you get sufficient folate, make asparagus a frequent addition to your meals since one cup of these green spears will fulfill nearly 66% of your daily folate needs.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Other great sources of folate include citrus fruits, beans (be sure to sprout them to maximize their nutrients and enhance absorption by the body), broccoli, cauliflower, beets, lentils and leafy green vegetables such as spinach and turnip greens.

5. Wild Salmon

  • Brain Food Facts:According to a study conducted by Tufts University in Boston, subjects who consumed an average of three servings of oily fish a week had almost 50 percent lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. These individuals had significantly higher levels of omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid in the blood than those who took less fish in their diets. And salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids as well as other important nutrients such as vitamin D and B12 that can help to prevent neurodegenerative disorders.But, as wild caught salmons, frozen or canned, generally contain more omega-3, less omega-6 and fewer toxins, you’re better off buying the wild version whenever possible. Aim to eat at least two to three servings of oily fish each week to supply your body with inflammation-fighting compounds. If you’re concerned about environmental toxins such as PCB in seafood, you can also consider taking whole fish oil supplement derived from wild salmon.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Anchovies and sardines are also very good sources of omega-3 fats. For people who don’t eat fish, walnuts, flaxseeds and dark green leafy vegetables are rich in plant-based omega-3 precursor, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). But they lack eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the two primary omega-3’s. Although technically ALA is converted by the body to EPA and DHA, in reality, the conversion rate is very low (only about one to two percent) and is further reduced if your omega-6 intake is high. So relying solely on walnuts, flaxseeds and dark green leafy vegetables may not provide your body with adequate omega-3 fats. In this case, you can boost your omega-3 intake either by selecting more EPA and DHA-fortified foods, take vegan omega-3 supplements, or both.

6. Walnut

  • Brain Food Facts:Research by the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging suggested that a moderate, but not high, diet of walnuts helped improve motor and cognitive skills in older rodents. The experts believed that a combination of polyphenols, omega-3 fats and other bioactive substances in walnut is responsible for this beneficial effect.But more is not necessarily good. The study discovered that mice fed on a walnut diet equivalent to a human eating more than 1 ounce of walnuts, or about seven to nine walnuts, a day actually displayed lower long-term memory skills.This may be due to the high omega-6 content of walnut. Although this brain-like nut is high in alpha-linolenic acid, it’s even richer in linoleic acid, an omega-6 essential fatty acid. Linoleic acid could lead to more inflammatory compounds being created and less anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats in the body when the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio is out of balanced.Alternative Foods for the Brain:

    Though the exact mechanism of how walnut improves cognitive function is unclear, most doctors and nutritionists recommend eating a wide range of food, including nuts. So don’t stop at walnuts. Each day, grab and enjoy a handful of mixed nuts, dried fruits and seeds — like hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, raisins, dried cranberries and blueberries — to get a spectrum of health-boosting nutrients each day.

7. Cherry

  • Brain Food Facts:Scientists found that the antioxidant compounds, anthocyanins, which give cherries their bright red color possess anti-inflammatory properties that could work like pain medications such as Vioxx and Celebrex, but without the nasty side effects. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs can cause adverse effects, some of which are severe like stomach bleeding and heart attack, especially among the elderly. But cherries do not irritate the stomach the way manufactured drugs do and they also contain compounds that keep platelets in the blood from clumping together.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Berries like blueberries, raspberries and strawberries are jam-packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory phytochemicals that help to reduce brain inflammation and brain oxidative stress, both of which have been associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s.

8. Turmeric

  • Brain Food Facts:Plaques in the brain are thought to contribute to the degradation of brain cells and lead to Alzheimer’s disease. A study found that curcumin in turmeric is an effective substance that removes plagues from the brain. Turmeric, a top anti-inflammatory food used since ancient times, is commonly used as a spice in curry dishes. Countries with populations that eat curry regularly, such as India, have been observed to report lower rates of dementia. Add this inexpensive, versatile spice into your meals at least once a week to cool inflammation and ward off dementia.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Ginger is a close cousin of turmeric with similar anti-inflammatory properties. Though study on its effect on the brain is limited, ginger’s ability to reduce inflammation may also confer some inhibitory effect on dementia indirectly.

9. Apple

  • Brain Food Facts:There are now even more reasons to take an apple a day. Quercetin, found in abundance in the skins of apples, has been found to protect the brain from damages associated with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in studies conducted by Cornell University. Other studies have also suggested that eating apples may also help reduce the risk of cancer.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Capers, a common ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine, lovage and red onion are also excellent sources of quercetin. Berries like cherries, raspberries and cranberries also contain some but lower amounts of this flavonoid. Article by The Conscious Life

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“What is the difference between a Medicare Medigap policy and a Medicare Advantage policy”? from Sarah in Greensboro. There are several differences, but the biggest difference  is a Medigap or Supplement policy is insurance purchased from an Insurance Company to offset the costs that Original Medicare A & B do not cover.  There are several different policies available in NC, and the only difference in the policies from company to company is how the insurance company prices the plans.  When choosing a Medigap policy, then you would also need to purchase a Medicare Part D plan from an Insurance company. 

A Medicare Advantage plan is considered a Medicare Part C plan.  They are offered through several insurance companies and usually consist of Parts A, B & D.  They either have a small cost or no cost.  These plans will be used in lieu of original Medicare. 

If you would like to know more about the differences in a Medicare Supplement and a Medicare Advantage plan, or if you need help evaluating your situation during the annual enrollment period, please feel free to call Melody Anderson, your local Broker at 336. 707.9308

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal thanks you for this helpful summary Melody.

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