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Archive for the ‘Brain Aneurysms’ Category

The Brain Injury Association of NC  hosted a Caregiver’s Appreciation Morning Out in High Point, NC. Some factors contributing to brain injury include

  • Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Stroke
  • Car Accidents (texting, drunk driving)
  • Falls
  • Trauma from Military Explosions
  • Brain Aneurysms
  • We learned a young girl wearing glass hair accessories fell and her skull received significant damage, changing her life indefinitely

♥ Note-Brain Injuries are usually not diagnosed within the homeless population. We may see them staggering as if under the influence of a foreign substance, but could be a result of tramatic brain injury.

It is called a Disease, but with no cure.

Peggy Nelson, Kitty Barringer, Susan Fewell, and Yvonne Josephson, CRRN or HP REgional Hospital orgainzed the Love Journey of Caregiving. There were personal and heartwarming stories shared, humor, resources, and caregiver nominations, along with several door prizes given away.

Traumatic Brain Injury Statistics

The meeting was very informational and enlightening. Tuesday February 1st at 7pm, Millis Regional Health Education Center with host an event for all Survivors, Family Members, Friends, and Professionals recognizing the Brain Injury Alliance. More details, contact John at 336.887.0745.

Everyone walked away with a copy of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal and we were glad to be a part of the luncheon and help promote this Hidden Disability.

Angela Howard spoke on the challenges of caregiving. Her mother endured a stroke and her husband diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimers Disease. The importance of health was reiterated and benefits no one if the caregiver does not surround themselves with caring and compassionate family and friends.

 

WALK & ROLL-athon Burmil Park April 16th, details here, 2011. Additional information will be provided within the March issue of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal.

The Brain Injury Association of NC is partnering with Camp Carefree September 16-18th, 2011 in Stokesdale, NC.  Sons of Italy has partnered with Camp Carefree, a hidden local treasure.

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A brain aneurysm, also called a cerebral or intracranial aneurysm, is an abnormal bulging of one of the arteries within the brain, with November being National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month. Approximately one in 15 people in the United States will develop a brain aneurysm during their lifetime. Aneurysms may result from congenital defects, preexisting conditions such as high blood pressure and atherosclerosis (fatty deposits in the arteries), or head trauma. Cerebral aneurysms occur more commonly in adults than in children but they may occur at any age. They are more common in women than in men, by a ratio of 3 to 2.

50% of ruptured brain aneurysms are fatal. Individuals should seek medical attention if; there is pain behind an eye, a dilated pupil, change in vision or double vision, numbness or paralysis of one side of the face or a drooping eyelid. These symptoms could be related to an unruptured brain aneurysm. Unruptured brain aneurysms are sometimes treated to prevent rupture.

Symptoms are more critical of a large, ruptured brain aneurysms and need immediate attention including; extreme and sudden severe headache, stiff neck, seizure, loss of consciousness, blurred or double vision, confusion or sensitivity to light, nausea and vomiting. The main goals of treatment once an aneurysm has ruptured are to stop the bleeding and potential permanent damage to the brain and to reduce the risk of recurrence.

It is important to note that not all aneurysms are treated at the time of diagnosis. Patients need to consult a neurovascular specialist to determine if they are candidates for treatment. To get to the aneurysm, surgeons must first remove a section of the skull, a procedure called a craniotomy. The surgeon then spreads the brain tissue apart and places a tiny metal clip across the neck to stop blood flow into the aneurysm. After clipping the aneurysm, the bone is secured in its original place, and the wound is closed.  

Information provided by Brainaneurysm.com.

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