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Posts Tagged ‘alzheimer support’

North Carolina is ranked among the highest in the nation regarding obesity, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. In general, states in the West and New England rank lowest in the fattest states rankings, while states in the South and the Rust Belt tend to rank highest. 57% of North Carolina adults are overweight or obese.

Some factors causing weight gain and obesity are

  • Lack of energy balance
  • Pregnancy
  • Emotional
  • Inactive Lifestyle
  • Environment
  • Health conditions
  • Family genes
  • Medicines
  • Smoking
  • Age
  • Lack of Sleep to name a few

Could we, as North Carolinians change those statistics?

Let’s Fight the Fat Stat and Learn to Live Lean and Mean with our local resources (and they are not difficult to find)

Angela Howard-Health Coach with Take Shape for Life addresses  issues on an individual basis. Her motto, “There is no 1 solution to weight loss, it is a combination.” Angela has personally lost 212 pounds and works with clients who desire loosing 2-5 pounds per week, taking the healthy route.

Below is a picture of Angela and her husband, both at least 200 pounds over-weight. An unfortunate reality was the diagnosis of early onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, motivating her decision to change her life.

Angela provides workshops regarding health and wellness

What foods to select, how to prepare, are supplements needed, exercise implementation or other activities to improve quality of life are all examined. It is a known fact, people trying to lose weight with the help of a coach or another trained health professional, do so faster and also keep the weight off. They act as your support system while you walk the journey to a healthier lifestyle. Angela can be reached for questions at, 336.301.9321. Fight the Fat!

If you have been declined for health insurance, or feel you may not be accepted, there are other alternatives, call Melody Anderson of Chadwick Insurance Group, LLC for assistance. There is no charge for consultations.

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The end of Alzheimer’s disease starts here. June 11th, 2011

Join the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s™ and unite in a movement to reclaim the future for millions. With more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s, and nearly 11 million more serving as caregivers, the time to act is now!

When you register for Walk to End Alzheimer’s, you’re joining an unstoppable force of thousands of people who are standing up to this devastating disease.

Our journey starts now. It’s easy to join our team:

Register. It takes just a few minutes online.

Start a team. Participating in Walk to End Alzheimer’s is even more fun with a group. Ask your co-workers, family and friends to walk as a team. You’ll be amazed at how many people want to help.

Fundraise. Every Walk to End Alzheimer’s participant is asked to raise money for the fight against Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s Association staff are ready to support you every step of the way with tips, tools and advice.
 
Get Creative. Raise money with our online tools, hold a fundraising event or ask for a donation when you’re face-to-face.
 
Walk! Walk to End Alzheimer’s is a unique experience. See the difference you can make as we walk to change the course of Alzheimer’s together.

Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer care, support and research. Since 1989, this all age, all-ability walk has mobilized millions to join the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, raising more than $347 million for the cause. Events are held annually in the fall in nearly 600 communities nationwide.

All Walk to End Alzheimer’s donations benefit the Alzheimer’s Association, the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support and research. The mission of the Alzheimer’s Association is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University has a two-year research study and needs your help, click here

Suggested foods may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal

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 Alzheimer’s Disease is on the rise with someone being diagnosed every 70 seconds. Families are choosing to keep loved ones at home, hiring in home care agencies to help or

choosing a reputable facility specializing in Alzheimer Care.

One of the top Alzheimer Care facilities in the Buffalo, NY area is Harris Hill Nursing Facility, not because of one of my family members resides here, but the various activities, parties and projects offered.

For Alzheimer patients who are aware of their surroundings and have the desire to feel needed, activities are crucial on a daily basis.

Activities range from tactile (papercrafting, repetitive projects), audio (singing, listening to story-telling or music), physical (gardening or house keeping). Depending on the patients level of function, there is an activity for them, even if for only a few minutes per day.

 

When I visit Harris Hill, one particular woman with Alzheimer’s Disease is always carrying her baby doll in her arms being so attentive with such love in her eyes.

 

The parties and events are long processes with staff moving very slow. It is not the destination it is the journey. High strung people like myself have to slow down and enjoy the talk, dance and smiles of the residents who think they have known you all of their lives.

 

Find out what kind of activities are offered when you are selecting your loved ones new home. The disease may bring out new personality traits and hidden talents, which are just a moment away of being revealed to you.

Alzheimer’s Disease facilities in the Piedmont Triad Area can schedule gardening activities with Diana Digs Dirt

of papercrafting projects with Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal

We are looking for a monthly papercrafting location in the Greensboro, NC for a workshop to meet on the 3rd Friday of the month from 5-11PM. This would be added exposure for your facility where workshops will be photographed and posted on Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal’s Blog. The workshops will reach out to community members wanting to learn how to compose keepsakes of loved ones, pets or baby’s gone too soon in the form of journal books, scrapbooks, collages, cards and more.

Email- Diana (@) justacloudaway.com to schedule activities

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Crafting and Gardening are activities offered by

Just a Cloud Away, Inc.™ Journal and Diana Digs Dirt, engaging Alzheimer Patients in projects with minimal stress and optimal enjoyment for residents, caregivers and staff, including facilities and in private homes.

Often it’s hard to know just how to react and interact with Alzheimer’s patients. With a little knowledge, consistent practice, and lots of patience,  daily life for the patient and caregiver can improve. Just remember to keep activities simple, to provide a routine, and to individualize the activities according to the patient’s interest and abilities. You and the Alzheimer’s patient will be rewarded for your efforts.

Some of the recreational activities for Alzheimer’s patients are craft ideas, like scrapbooking, sorting out the photographs, making a collage, writing notes to relatives and posting notes. While trying out some craft ideas with dementia patients, make sure you choose an activity that is less complex. For instance, if you are making a collage, let a dementia patient only paste in a guided sequence. If you make them cut the paper pieces, draw and add more activities, as they are likely to get frustrated and express a long-lasting bout of anger. Thus, be very patient and avoid any complications, while working with such patients

Gardening is another simple, effective and meaningful activity.

Gardens can help patients feel connected to nature and to life, whether they can actively participate in the preparation and cultivation of the garden or simply be observers of the wonders of nature.  Exposure to nature’s sights, sounds, smells and physical sensations can be noticeably beneficial to a patient’s spiritual, psychological, social and physical health.  The idea is to engage the senses and provide a connection to the creation and growth of living things, mentioned by Sandra Webber.

Simple crafting in a Malaysia  Alzheimer facility creates an atmosphere with a greater sense of peace for residents, caregivers and staff.

Please contact Diana (@) justacloudaway.com for activity scheduling. All materials, supplies and tools are provided. Click, to view a past workshop.

We are happy to photograph the workshops at your facility, for inclusion on the blog of:

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The home had the typical and comforting scent of any Grandparents house, cottage-like. The room was warm and cozy with Joe reclined in the corner chair wearing a flannel and covered with a fuzzy fleece blanket. He was awake, talkative and in a jovial mood.

 Joe and Evelyn

Joe and Margaret Davis just celebrated their 59th wedding anniversary with her knowing the past 5 years her husband had Alzheimer’s disease. Margaret noticed signs of the disease more than 8 years ago and decided to keep her husband at home. Margaret is still in good health and with the assistance of an in-home care agency to help with cooking (for both), cleaning, companionship and looking after Joe, they can live together. The agency reminds Margaret that hurtful words Joe would occasionally speak is the disease talking and being in the military (long-term memory) may contribute to other comments.

 

Joe was also emotional this day and held Margaret’s hand saying,” When I was 18, I loved this woman and I can’t remember her name.” Margaret stated her and Joe always held hands and still pray together, with Joe remembering most of the Lord’s Prayer. While Joe was still awake and in good spirits, Margaret decided to play a song on the piano while the rest of us tried to sing. Amazing Grace was the selection and Joe was very moved by the music by letting go of a few tears and squeezing Evelyn’s hand.

 Joe and Margaret

Margaret is able to treasure lasting memory’s within the walls of their home, especially with the love and support of their daughter Millie. Millie checks on them regularly and communicates directly with the in-home care agency regarding concerns or issues needing to be addressed, including the 90 day assessments.

 Margaret plays Amazing Grace

As we left, Margaret was sure to show us all the photographs of them together through the years, with every picture having a detailed story. Joe said good-bye to us and that Margaret knew everything and is a beautiful woman he would never forget.

Evelyn Yalung of Options for Senior America takes on new clients, however, considers them an extended part of her family with frequent visits, phone calls and gift giving. Most of her clients are spouses wanting to keep loved ones at home. For those with advanced Alzheimer’s Disease, Options for Senior America provides 24 hour in-home care. This is due to the patient needing constant care. Those with the disease may wander and put themselves in danger. Evelyn knows that families with loved ones diagnosed with the disease are overwhelmed. She offers a listening ear and literature to walk families through the transitions forthcoming. In-home care provides Margaret with a peace of mind and someone to talk to when matters are too much to handle by herself.

Read a daughter’s perspective

Read a granddaughter’s perspective 

Free Supplies, tools and materials for monthly papercrafting workshop to honor loved ones and remember those who have passed.

Emerald Event Center

2000 East Wendover

January 21st Friday Night

from 5-11pm

RSVP Diana@justacloudaway.com

 

Sponsored by

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A Personal Story of a Daughter’s Love

by Rose Mecca

I feel very blessed to have had the opportunity to be a Caregiver for my mom, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.  She lived with us for almost 8 years.  But I would have NEVER been able to do so without a caring, loving husband who was more of a son than a son-in-law to mom.  Generous siblings greatly aided us in her care by allowing down time by taking mom out for dinners.

 If a person is alone in this process called Care giving, the days seem never-ending.  I can’t imagine the trials and tribulations of the adventure without help.

 When mom first came to live with us, she had not been diagnosed with her illness.  Within 3 months, the unimaginable became reality.  My husband and I accepted the facts as they were and began making changes in our schedules and that of our mother.

 

I think one of the biggest mistakes in the beginning months was not asking for more help from family members and not expressing our frustrations and anxieties dealing with mom.  When we asked for help and were more open, the help was there.  The Alzheimer’s Association was also great in making us aware of the resources available to us.

 

Mom was still volunteering at our local hospital in the beginning, but over time became more and more difficult for her.  She could not remember the directions even with visual aids.  She could no longer follow simple directions at volunteering and had to be monitored constantly.  We suggested that she discontinue her volunteering and she agreed.  She was aware of her memory problems and it was so sad to see.  They loved her at the hospital and to this day tell us how much they miss her smiling face.

This move robbed her freedom while putting more responsibility on us to provide continual activity for her.  She has always had lots of energy but now it was in overdrive.  My husband devised activities for her such as, stringing beads, making 100 piece puzzles or sweeping the sidewalk around our house.  We simply could not find enough to keep her busy.  We were the ones getting exhausted while she never seemed to tire.  She then started to ‘shadow’ us so that when one of us left her vision, she wanted to know where we were. 

After 8 years, placement in a nursing home became necessary.  I cried and still cry when I think of that day when we placed her in her new ‘home’.  I know in my head it was right, but my heart cannot accept that fact.

For anyone in this situation, I would suggest communicating immediately with other family members and taking full advantage of help available for Caregivers.  The Alzheimer’s Association is a wonderful and helpful agency.  Don’t attempt to do it alone and never let your own health suffer while Care giving. 

Looking back, I never regret those years with mom.  Life is more peaceful now for us and for mom.  We do not worry about her.  She is still loved and believes that she is a volunteer in her new home and we all visit her very often.

Granddaughter speaks on Alzheimer’s

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