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Posts Tagged ‘awareness month’

Just a Cloud Away, Inc.™ Journal’s Editorial Calendar is based on the Awareness Months, national or special days of remembrance, monthly flowers or gemstones and community events, fundraisers, and activities of the Piedmont Triad Area.

January

  • Garnet
  • Carnation, Snowdrop
  • Awareness Month- Cervical Cancer, Poison & Birth Defect Prevention, Blood Donor

February

  • Amethyst
  • Violet, Primrose
  • Awareness Month- Heart Disease, Bipolar Disorder, Eating Disorder, Heartworm (Pets)
  • 14th– Organ Donor Day

March

  • Aquamarine
  • Daffodil
  • Awareness Month-American Red Cross, Poison & Brain Injury

April

  • Diamond
  • Daisy, Sweet Pea
  • Awareness Month-STD, Alcohol, Organ Donor, Autism,Rabies (Pets),Parkinson’s
  • 22nd-Earth Day
  • 8th– D.A.R.E. Day

May

  • Emerald
  • Lily of the Valley, Hawthorn
  • Awareness Month- Stroke, Mental Health, ALS
  • 9th– Mothers Day
  • 31st– Memorial Day

June

  • Pearl, Moonstone or Alexandrite
  • Rose, Honeysuckle
  • Awareness Month- Skin, Prostrate Cancer, Safety
  • 7th– National Cancer Survivors Day
  • 20th– Fathers Day

July

  • Ruby
  • Larkspur, Water Lily
  • Awareness Month- UV, Solar , Cord Blood, International Group B Strep, Herbal/Prescription

August

  • Peridot
  • Poppy, Gladiolas
  • Awareness Month- Immunization, Breastfeeding
  • August 3rd-America’s Night Out Against Crime

September

  • Sapphire
  • Aster, Morning Glory
  • Prostrate, Ovarian and
    Childhood Cancer, Pain Awareness
  • 10th– World Suicide Prevention Day
  • 11th– 911

October

  • Opal or Tourmaline
  • Calendula, Cosmos
  • Awareness Month- Pregnancy & Infant Loss, SIDS, Breast Cancer, Fire Prevention, Bullying Prevention

November

  • Topaz or Citrine
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Awareness Month- Alzheimer, Caregiver, Lung Cancer, Long Term Care, Brain Aneurysm, Prematurity, Hospice, Adoption
  • 11th– Veteran’s Day
  • 18th-Great American Smoke out

December

  • Turquoise, Blue Topaz
  • Holly, Narcissus
  • Awareness Month- Drunk & Drugged Driving, AIDS, Seasonal Depression
  • 1st– World AIDS Day

Journals are located online, here on the blog and in print with over 300 locations. Contact us with additional awareness causes at, Diana@justacloudaway.com.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc.™ Journal is offering sponsorship of each monthly publication for a $200.00 donation.

Another way to support the continuation of the journal is our monthly “Quilt of Remembrance”. $25 to purchase a memorial ad to honor a loved one or pregnancy. Those wanting to honor a pet are also welcome to do so.

Memorial ads are 3 lines with 18 characters per line including spaces. Checks can be mailed to

Just a Cloud Away-PO Box 327 – Julian, NC 27283

If you think your story may help someone else, please contact us for an interview.

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A brain aneurysm, also called a cerebral or intracranial aneurysm, is an abnormal bulging of one of the arteries within the brain, with November being National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month. Approximately one in 15 people in the United States will develop a brain aneurysm during their lifetime. Aneurysms may result from congenital defects, preexisting conditions such as high blood pressure and atherosclerosis (fatty deposits in the arteries), or head trauma. Cerebral aneurysms occur more commonly in adults than in children but they may occur at any age. They are more common in women than in men, by a ratio of 3 to 2.

50% of ruptured brain aneurysms are fatal. Individuals should seek medical attention if; there is pain behind an eye, a dilated pupil, change in vision or double vision, numbness or paralysis of one side of the face or a drooping eyelid. These symptoms could be related to an unruptured brain aneurysm. Unruptured brain aneurysms are sometimes treated to prevent rupture.

Symptoms are more critical of a large, ruptured brain aneurysms and need immediate attention including; extreme and sudden severe headache, stiff neck, seizure, loss of consciousness, blurred or double vision, confusion or sensitivity to light, nausea and vomiting. The main goals of treatment once an aneurysm has ruptured are to stop the bleeding and potential permanent damage to the brain and to reduce the risk of recurrence.

It is important to note that not all aneurysms are treated at the time of diagnosis. Patients need to consult a neurovascular specialist to determine if they are candidates for treatment. To get to the aneurysm, surgeons must first remove a section of the skull, a procedure called a craniotomy. The surgeon then spreads the brain tissue apart and places a tiny metal clip across the neck to stop blood flow into the aneurysm. After clipping the aneurysm, the bone is secured in its original place, and the wound is closed.  

Information provided by Brainaneurysm.com.

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