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Posts Tagged ‘creeping phlox’

Planting “Green” (eco-friendly) flowers/plants within cemeteries or Residential Memory Gardens would increase the beauty of the resting places and may decrease maintenance, whether it is a memorial monuments, statuary, or outdoor garden art. Non-invasive groundcover grow low to the ground and usually have a definite width. In zone 7, we have many options including, deciduous, evergreen, annuals, perennials or herbs. Mowable or crevice groundcovers are very low maintenance.

Even if you decide to use an annual groundcover and need to plant yearly, there is healing taking place and a connection being made between one’s self and nature.

Some suggestions for sun groundcovers are:

Creeping phlox comes in a variety of colors, blue, violet, white, red, pink and bi-color

Creeping sedum “Angelina”

Ice plant is deciduous

 

Dichondra is an annual

 

Hens and Chicks add great texture and drought tolerate

Laurentia flowers blue in the spring

A few suggestions for monuments located in the shade or part shade:

Creeping  jenny “Gold”

Ajuga is absolutely gorgeous

Don’t forget about the smaller bulbs. They are finished blooming when mowing season begins.

Some additional ideas are creeping thyme, mazus, scotch moss and irish moss.

Mowing usually begins in April and many of the plants are finished blooming and could use a good mow. In zone 7, mower blades are maintained at 4 inches, plenty of room for these small plants. Most of the plants suggested can tolerate foot traffic.

Please join Just a Cloud Away, ™ Inc. Journal for a free workshop regarding mowable groundcovers at, Celebrate Mother Earth in SE Guilford. Bring a plant to swap and you may walk away with the very plant you desire. Here is a brief list of avavliable plants; verbena, black mondo grass, mazus, yarrow, columbine, st johns wort, crape myrtle tree, golden raintree, helleborus, rose of sharon, daylily, monkey grass, roses, raydon’s favorite aster’s, siberian iris, plumbago, german iris, sweet pea vine, and so much more

We hope to see you in the spring

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