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Posts Tagged ‘Healing’

Planting “Green” (eco-friendly) flowers/plants within cemeteries or Residential Memory Gardens would increase the beauty of the resting places and may decrease maintenance, whether it is a memorial monuments, statuary, or outdoor garden art. Non-invasive groundcover grow low to the ground and usually have a definite width. In zone 7, we have many options including, deciduous, evergreen, annuals, perennials or herbs. Mowable or crevice groundcovers are very low maintenance.

Even if you decide to use an annual groundcover and need to plant yearly, there is healing taking place and a connection being made between one’s self and nature.

Some suggestions for sun groundcovers are:

Creeping phlox comes in a variety of colors, blue, violet, white, red, pink and bi-color

Creeping sedum “Angelina”

Ice plant is deciduous

 

Dichondra is an annual

 

Hens and Chicks add great texture and drought tolerate

Laurentia flowers blue in the spring

A few suggestions for monuments located in the shade or part shade:

Creeping  jenny “Gold”

Ajuga is absolutely gorgeous

Don’t forget about the smaller bulbs. They are finished blooming when mowing season begins.

Some additional ideas are creeping thyme, mazus, scotch moss and irish moss.

Mowing usually begins in April and many of the plants are finished blooming and could use a good mow. In zone 7, mower blades are maintained at 4 inches, plenty of room for these small plants. Most of the plants suggested can tolerate foot traffic.

Please join Just a Cloud Away, ™ Inc. Journal for a free workshop regarding mowable groundcovers at, Celebrate Mother Earth in SE Guilford. Bring a plant to swap and you may walk away with the very plant you desire. Here is a brief list of avavliable plants; verbena, black mondo grass, mazus, yarrow, columbine, st johns wort, crape myrtle tree, golden raintree, helleborus, rose of sharon, daylily, monkey grass, roses, raydon’s favorite aster’s, siberian iris, plumbago, german iris, sweet pea vine, and so much more

We hope to see you in the spring

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The Brain Injury Association of NC  hosted a Caregiver’s Appreciation Morning Out in High Point, NC. Some factors contributing to brain injury include

  • Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Stroke
  • Car Accidents (texting, drunk driving)
  • Falls
  • Trauma from Military Explosions
  • Brain Aneurysms
  • We learned a young girl wearing glass hair accessories fell and her skull received significant damage, changing her life indefinitely

♥ Note-Brain Injuries are usually not diagnosed within the homeless population. We may see them staggering as if under the influence of a foreign substance, but could be a result of tramatic brain injury.

It is called a Disease, but with no cure.

Peggy Nelson, Kitty Barringer, Susan Fewell, and Yvonne Josephson, CRRN or HP REgional Hospital orgainzed the Love Journey of Caregiving. There were personal and heartwarming stories shared, humor, resources, and caregiver nominations, along with several door prizes given away.

Traumatic Brain Injury Statistics

The meeting was very informational and enlightening. Tuesday February 1st at 7pm, Millis Regional Health Education Center with host an event for all Survivors, Family Members, Friends, and Professionals recognizing the Brain Injury Alliance. More details, contact John at 336.887.0745.

Everyone walked away with a copy of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal and we were glad to be a part of the luncheon and help promote this Hidden Disability.

Angela Howard spoke on the challenges of caregiving. Her mother endured a stroke and her husband diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimers Disease. The importance of health was reiterated and benefits no one if the caregiver does not surround themselves with caring and compassionate family and friends.

 

WALK & ROLL-athon Burmil Park April 16th, details here, 2011. Additional information will be provided within the March issue of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal.

The Brain Injury Association of NC is partnering with Camp Carefree September 16-18th, 2011 in Stokesdale, NC.  Sons of Italy has partnered with Camp Carefree, a hidden local treasure.

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Holistic Healing Centers can

Change your Life

by Kathleen Chester

Holistic health is a popular medical philosophy that treats patients by focusing on the most essential physical aspects—taking emotional, spiritual, and physical health into account. For many years, pharmaceutical medications have dominated the world of western medicine. But synthetic medication always carries the risk of creating dangerous chemical reactions in the body. Holistic healing is a lifelong commitment to personal health and well being on the way to living a better life.

Holistic healing goes beyond the mind-body connection to achieve improved lifestyle and wellness. Your entire personal well-being is accounted for. Physical healing, mental health, wellness, emotional well-being and spiritual values are the areas in which holistic health centers focus. This method of treatment will help you find personal power to establish control over your mind and body.

A person who gets the treatment from a holistic health center also learns the value of having proper relationships, being part of a nurturing caring environment, and the importance of having compassion for all human beings. Piedmont Triad’s holistic healer and author, Janet Nestor is a local resource, providing several services, including energy work sessions.

There are various types of holistic healing therapies that you can receive from a healing center. Some of the most popular and widely used holistic healing therapies are:

Aromatherapy: This is a massage treatment of body, face, and scalp to improve blood circulation through the use of aromatic essential oils made from trees, flowers, and plants. This treatment provides relaxation through the use of accupressure. A local resource provides non-toxic cleaners utilizing essential oils, The Clean G.

Ayurveda medicine: This is an ancient healing system that uses combinations of herbs. It was developed over thousands of years in India.

Counseling: If you are going through a bad phase of life, it is essential that you need to overcome your depression. Expert psychologists will help you to overcome depression by counseling.

Herbal remedies: This is a traditional healing treatment based on the use of plants and plant extracts. Since pharmaceutical medicines are affecting our body badly, it is better to use the natural medicines to cure our diseases. Terry Rader can advise on holistic healing and prevention in the Piedmont Triad Area for pet care, specializing in senior dog care.

Homeopathy: This is a treatment based on a theory that many diseases can be cured by a very small amount of drugs.

Naturopathic medicine: This treatment heals through massage, exercise, acupuncture, and minor surgery.

Chinese medicine: Another type of treatment in holistic healing centers that includes acupuncture, herbal medicine, heat therapy, and nutritional and lifestyle counseling that treat a range of acute and chronic diseases.

To improve your wellbeing, you may want to visit www.centerforhealthandhealing.org and find out how to get natural healing treatment from well-trained doctors.

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Options for Bereaved Families

 Many changes have come about regarding the death industry, including how to mourn or celebrate a deceased family member or friend. The National Funeral Directors Association 2007 study showed that 23% of the respondents desired a very personalized funeral.

The Emerald Event Center is a facility truly celebrating a loved one because of the compassion, care and uniqueness they offer our community; one significant factor being great value meeting individual budgets, seating anywhere from 100- 500. Because of the spatial options, memorial and funeral services could be held in the same room for a more intimate setting, as opposed to a church and a funeral home.

The covered patio can be easily decorated and offers an outdoor sitting area.

Most of the decor is offered, in-house by Emerald.

 

The Emerald Event center is also the home of Create a Cake Catering, where fresh, comfort food is offered. In the past, the center held an Irish memorial service, given by their priest and meal where guests were fed favorite foods made from recipes family members provided for the cooking staff. A full bar was offered as well, because an ABC license is held by the center. A radio, Irish music cd’s, mementoes and personal stories about the gentleman were exchanged in a private room, where even the children felt comfortable to exchange memories of their Uncle. A Celebrate Life cake was also personalized with a picture and mementoes dear to him.

 

Beautiful Altars can be created.

For a beloved Veteran

For bereaved families of pregnancy and infant loss, the facility may be an option if the couple does not belong to a church or out – of- town family members will arrive at a later date. Angelversary cakes can be personalized to reflect the baby’s gender, nursery theme, zodiac sign, and birthstone, to recognize and honor the child. The Emerald Event Center will also be able to accommodate the last-minute decision to use their facility. Click here, how to help plan for baby loss.

Unnecessary driving miles can be avoided, by having the service, memorial, and meal in one place. If you would like to take a tour of the center, call 336.691.000.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal

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A Healthly Place has written a wonderful article regarding support for bereaved family members and friends.

Our local resource, Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal believes strongly in the power of listening to those suffering great sadness after their losses. Stories are shared within the journal for our community to somewhat walk in their shoes while educating ourselves for similar experiences we may face in the future.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal is funded by generous advertisers and those wanting to recognize a loved on within the journal, upon the  Quilt of Remembrance page. We are on our 12th month and have not profited and need your help, just to continue printing this resource.  We are more interested in reporting on those wanting to share their stories as part of their healing process, than solicit advertisers. Read past journals online.

How can I help an adult friend or family member deal with the death of a loved one?  Someone you know may be experiencing grief – perhaps the loss of a loved one, perhaps another type of loss – and you want to help. The fear of making things worse may encourage you to do nothing. Yet you do not wish to appear to be uncaring. Remember that it is better to try to do something, inadequate as you may feel, than to do nothing at all. Don’t attempt to sooth or stifle the emotions of the bereaved. Tears and anger are an important part of the healing process. Grief is not a sign of weakness. It is the result of a strong relationship and deserves the honor of strong emotion. When supporting someone in their grief the most important thing is to simply listen. Grief is a very confusing process, expressions of logic are lost on the griever. The question “tell me how you are feeling” followed by a patient and attentive ear will seem like a major blessing to the grief stricken. Be present, reveal your caring, listen. Your desire is to assist your friend down the path of healing. They will find their own way down that path, but they need a helping hand, an assurance that they are not entirely alone on their journey. It does not matter that you do not understand the details, your presence is enough. Risk a visit, it need not be long. The mourner may need time to be alone but will surely appreciate the effort you made to visit. Do some act of kindness. There are always ways to help. Run errands, answer the phone, prepare meals, mow the lawn, care for the children, shop for groceries, meet incoming planes or provide lodging for out of town relatives. The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.
How can I deal with the death of a loved one?

Bereavement is a powerful, life-changing experience that most people find overwhelming the first time. Although grief is a natural process of human life, most of us are not inherently able to manage it alone. At the same time, others are often unable to provide aid or insight because of discomfort with the situation and the desire to avoid making things worse. The following passage explains how some of our “normal” assumptions about grief may make it more difficult to deal with.

Five Assumptions That May Complicate
  1. Life prepares us for loss.
  2. Family and friends will understand.
  3. The bereaved should be finished with their grief within one year or something is wrong.
  4. Along with the end of grief’s pain comes the end of the memories.
  5. The bereaved should grieve alone.Provided courtesy of Jack Redden, CCE, M.A., President; John Redden, M.S., Vice President, Cemetery-Mortuary Consultants Inc., Memphis, Tennessee  More is learned about loss through experience than through preparation. Living may not provide preparation for survival. Handling grief resulting from the death of a loved one is a process that takes hard work. The fortunate experience of a happy life may not have built a complete foundation for handling loss. Healing is built through perseverance, support and understanding. The bereaved need others: Find others who are empathetic. 
     
    How can I help an adult friend or family member deal with the death of a loved one?
     

     

     
     
     

    Someone you know may be experiencing grief – perhaps the loss of a loved one, perhaps another type of loss – and you want to help. The fear of making things worse may encourage you to do nothing. Yet you do not wish to appear to be uncaring. Remember that it is better to try to do something, inadequate as you may feel, than to do nothing at all. Don’t attempt to sooth or stifle the emotions of the griever. Tears and anger are an important part of the healing process. Grief is not a sign of weakness. It is the result of a strong relationship and deserves the honor of strong emotion. When supporting someone in their grief the most important thing is to simply listen. Grief is a very confusing process, expressions of logic are lost on the griever. The question “tell me how you are feeling” followed by a patient and attentive ear will seem like a major blessing to the grief stricken. Be present, reveal your caring, listen. Your desire is to assist your friend down the path of healing. They will find their own way down that path, but they need a helping hand, an assurance that they are not entirely alone on their journey. It does not matter that you do not understand the details, your presence is enough. Risk a visit, it need not be long. The mourner may need time to be alone but will surely appreciate the effort you made to visit. Do some act of kindness. There are always ways to help. Run errands, answer the phone, prepare meals, mow the lawn, care for the children, shop for groceries, meet incoming planes or provide lodging for out of town relatives. The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.

    How can I deal with the death of a loved one?

     

     
     
     
     

    Bereavement is a powerful, life-changing experience that most people find overwhelming the first time. Although grief is a natural process of human life, most of us are not inherently able to manage it alone. At the same time, others are often unable to provide aid or insight because of discomfort with the situation and the desire to avoid making things worse. The following passage explains how some of our “normal” assumptions about grief may make it more difficult to deal with.

    Five Assumptions That May Complicate

     

    Life prepares us for loss.
    After the funeral service is over the bereaved may find themselves alone. They may feel as though they are going crazy, painfully uncertain in their world of thoughts and emotions. The bereaved begin to feel normal again when the experience is shared with others who have lost a loved one. Then, in reaching out, the focus of life becomes forward. The bereaved need others: Find others who are experienced.
      

    Provided courtesy of Jack Redden, CCE, M.A., President; John Redden, M.S., Vice President, Cemetery-Mortuary Consultants Inc., Memphis, Tennessee

     

     
     
     
     

     

    More is learned about loss through experience than through preparation. Living may not provide preparation for survival. Handling grief resulting from the death of a loved one is a process that takes hard work. The fortunate experience of a happy life may not have built a complete foundation for handling loss. Healing is built through perseverance, support and understanding. The bereaved need others: Find others who are empathetic.

    Family and friends will understand.

     

    If a spouse dies children lose a parent, a sibling loses a sibling, a parent loses a child and a friend loses a friend. Only one loses a spouse. Each response is different according to the relationship. Family and friends may not be capable of understanding each other thoroughly. Consider the story of Job’s grief in the Bible. Job’s wife did not understand his grief. His friends did their best work the first week when they just sat and did not speak. It was when they began to share their judgements of Job and his life that they complicated Job’s grief. Allowance must be made so that grief may be experienced and processed over time. The bereaved need others: Find others who are accepting.
     
     

    The bereaved should be finished with their grief within one year or something is wrong.

     

    During the first year the bereaved will experience one of everything for the first time alone: anniversaries, birthdays, occasions, etc. Therefore grief will last for at least one year. The cliche, “the healing hands of time,” does not go far enough to explain what must take place. The key to handling grief is in what work is done over time. It takes time and work to decide what to do and where to go with the new and changed life that is left behind. The bereaved need others: Find others who are patient.
     
     

    Along with the end of grief’s pain comes the end of the memories.

     

    At times, the bereaved may embrace the pain of grief believing it is all they have left. The lingering close bond to the deceased is sometimes thought to maintain the memories while, in fact, just the opposite is true. In learning to let go and live a new and changed life memories tend to come back more clearly. Growth and healing comes in learning to enjoy memories. The bereaved need others: Find new friends and interests.
     
     

    The bereaved should grieve alone.

     

     

After the funeral service is over the bereaved may find themselves alone. They may feel as though they are going crazy, painfully uncertain in their world of thoughts and emotions. The bereaved begin to feel normal again when the experience is shared with others who have lost a loved one. Then, in reaching out, the focus of life becomes forward. The bereaved need others: Find others who are experienced. At times, the bereaved may embrace the pain of grief believing it is all they have left. The lingering close bond to the deceased is sometimes thought to maintain the memories while, in fact, just the opposite is true. In learning to let go and live a new and changed life memories tend to come back more clearly. Growth and healing comes in learning to enjoy memories. The bereaved need others: Find new friends and interests. During the first year the bereaved will experience one of everything for the first time alone: anniversaries, birthdays, angelveraries, occasions, etc. Therefore grief will last for at least one year. The cliche, “the healing hands of time,” does not go far enough to explain what must take place. The key to handling grief is in what work is done over time. It takes time and work to decide what to do and where to go with the new and changed life that is left behind. The bereaved need others: Find others who are patient. If a spouse dies children lose a parent, a sibling loses a sibling, a parent loses a child and a friend loses a friend. Only one loses a spouse. Each response is different according to the relationship. Family and friends may not be capable of understanding each other thoroughly. Consider the story of Job’s grief in the Bible. Job’s wife did not understand his grief. His friends did their best work the first week when they just sat and did not speak. It was when they began to share their judgements of Job and his life that they complicated Job’s grief. Allowance must be made so that grief may be experienced and processed over time. The bereaved need others: Find others who are accepting.

 

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A new resource for women suffering from medical conditions such as, chemotherapy treatments, alopecia, lupus, thyroid problems, breast cancer, stress had their grand opening to the public January 14, 2011. Undetectable wigs are even suitable for hair loss from genetics and certain medications such as Wellbutrin, with the complete list from WebMD found here. Gastric bypass surgery can also be a factor in the loss of hair, but with a healthy diet, can be minimized. Health coaches are also very beneficial to keep you on track.

The opening was sponsored by Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal and many other resources were present offering their support, products and services.

Much of the conversation took place in the Serenity Garden designed by DianaDigsDirt.

Residential Serenity Gardens are also designed to engage the senses

Melody Anderson of Chadwick Insurance Group-offers the health insurance to meet  your needs and your budget.

Create a Cake Catering dropped off some yummy cookies and in March, will be hosting

 The Location is Emerald Event Center, click here for info

Pamela Thomas of NY Life- investing in life insurance is well spent dollars,  five investment options to avoid recommends Dave Ramsey.

XoCai Chocolate was another treat

Christiana Dyson of Mary Kay Cosmetics (host a party and %10 is dedicated to Breast Cancer Research). Chanel Lace Hair Gallery will provide space at shop if needed.

Angela Howard, Health Coach of Take Shape for Life offers guidance for women regarding a healthy diet and increased quality of living.

Local author, Janet Nestor signed books during the opening.

Katie, owner of The Clean G, offering cleaning products, air deodorizers and room spritzers, non-toxic, safe and organic.

B-Skinney Coffee gave out samples of a low-glycemic delicious cup of joe.

Janet Nestor treated us to complementary energy work sessions and they were greatly appreciated.

Janet has a gift of connecting with deceased family members through her energy work, more info here.

Thank all of you for your time and especially Sharon Ellis-Wiley of Chanel Lace Hair Gallery. Stop in to say hello.

Sharon has set up a small fund women who cannot afford a wig. Make a donation by purchasing a ribbon and write a brief note or your name on a Breast Cancer Awareness Ribbon and hang on tree in the Serenity Garden

 

Gorgeous flowers donated by Harris Teeter

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NFL star, Terrell Owens is grateful of his stardom and attributes fame to his grandmother. Because she raised Terrell, she was the one responsible for his love of the sport.

Alice Black was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease during Terrell’s first NFL season, 14 years ago. Mr. Owens stated, “It’s like she is dying a slow death.” Unfortunately, his grandmother will never know how he has thrived at the sport and  no longer recognizes her grandson.

Terrell spreads awareness of Alzheimer’s Disease by participating in Memory Walks to raise money for reasearch. He has also appeared in several public announcements regarding the disease. Several years ago he testified before Congress to increase  federal funding for research.

At the ago of 76, Alice Black is now residing in a nursing home down south, where her communication skills have diminished .

Terrell wishes very much his grandmother could share his achievements with him and to thank her.

Article by WebMD

An Afro-American Alzheimer Research Study is being conducted at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Keeping Memories Alive. They are looking for participants, click here.

If you would like a loved one honored on our Quilt of Remembrance, in full color print within Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal, please click here. We will gladly mail copies to you and your family.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal

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Crafting and Gardening are activities offered by

Just a Cloud Away, Inc.™ Journal and Diana Digs Dirt, engaging Alzheimer Patients in projects with minimal stress and optimal enjoyment for residents, caregivers and staff, including facilities and in private homes.

Often it’s hard to know just how to react and interact with Alzheimer’s patients. With a little knowledge, consistent practice, and lots of patience,  daily life for the patient and caregiver can improve. Just remember to keep activities simple, to provide a routine, and to individualize the activities according to the patient’s interest and abilities. You and the Alzheimer’s patient will be rewarded for your efforts.

Some of the recreational activities for Alzheimer’s patients are craft ideas, like scrapbooking, sorting out the photographs, making a collage, writing notes to relatives and posting notes. While trying out some craft ideas with dementia patients, make sure you choose an activity that is less complex. For instance, if you are making a collage, let a dementia patient only paste in a guided sequence. If you make them cut the paper pieces, draw and add more activities, as they are likely to get frustrated and express a long-lasting bout of anger. Thus, be very patient and avoid any complications, while working with such patients

Gardening is another simple, effective and meaningful activity.

Gardens can help patients feel connected to nature and to life, whether they can actively participate in the preparation and cultivation of the garden or simply be observers of the wonders of nature.  Exposure to nature’s sights, sounds, smells and physical sensations can be noticeably beneficial to a patient’s spiritual, psychological, social and physical health.  The idea is to engage the senses and provide a connection to the creation and growth of living things, mentioned by Sandra Webber.

Simple crafting in a Malaysia  Alzheimer facility creates an atmosphere with a greater sense of peace for residents, caregivers and staff.

Please contact Diana (@) justacloudaway.com for activity scheduling. All materials, supplies and tools are provided. Click, to view a past workshop.

We are happy to photograph the workshops at your facility, for inclusion on the blog of:

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Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common form of demetia in people 65 years and older and every 70 seconds, someone is diagnosed with the disease. 5.3 million American’s and their families are touched by Alzheimer’s Disease.

1. Dark Chocolate

  • Brain Food Facts:Studies carried out by Norwegian researchers found that the flavonoids in cocoa increase blood flow to the brain and may help to protect against conditions with reduced cerebral blood flow like dementia and stroke. To get the most benefits, buy chocolates with low sugar but high cocoa content (70% or more is the best like these 80% organic extra dark chocolates from Vital Choice).However, while cocoa is rich in beneficial compounds, it’s also high in saturated fats. Many times, it’s also paired with high-fat ingredients like full cream in desserts. So it’s best to keep dark chocolate to a small once-a-week treat.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Flavonoids can be found in practically all fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices. A good rule of thumb is that the more colorful a fruit or vegetable is, the higher the levels of flavonoids. Some flavonoid-rich foods that have been studied intensively include red wine, green tea and cherries which will be discussed in detail below.

2. Red Wine

  • Brain Food Facts:The same Norwegian study on dark chocolate also credited modest wine drinking for conferring protective effect on cognitive function and decreasing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. This is due to the high levels of flavonoids and possibly other polyphenolics such as resveratrol that are presence in red wine.However, alcohol is a double-edged sword that should be used with caution. Because, ironically, many studies have also found that excessive alcohol intake can lead to dementia as well as a host of other serious health conditions such as cancer by triggering chronic inflammation. So if you do drink, limit yourself to no more than one glass a day.It’s also important to note that in the first few hours after drinking wine, alcohol may actually slow thinking and interfere with the memory temporarily. If you’re preparing for an important test or going to sit for an examination, drinking wine is probably not the way to boost your performance.Alternative Foods for the Brain:

    Green tea is rich in a type of flavonoid known as catechins which can reach as high as 1 gram in a single cup. Numerous studies have attest to the health beneficial properties of green tea including its ability to cut the risk of cancer as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Its ability to keep weight in check also makes green tea a popular choice in many health promoting diets.

3. Clam

  • Brain Food Facts:Researchers in the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Aging (OPTIMA) found that elderly adults with low vitamin B12 levels had more than four times the usual risk of Alzheimer’s. It’s thought that when vitamin B12 levels are low, blood levels of homocysteine will raise, significantly increasing the risk for dementia, heart attack ad other ailments. To get a healthy dose of vitamin B12, look no further than clams. This shellfish packs a whopping 98.9mcg of vitamin B12 in just 100g serving, or 1648% of the RDA.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Rich sources of vitamin B12 are found in seafood and animal sources including oysters, mussels, fish, shrimps, scallops, liver of most animals and beef. Lower levels of vitamin B12 can also be found in seaweeds, yeasts and fermented foods like miso and tempeh.

4. Asparagus

  • Brain Food Facts:A Korean study published in 2008 found that individuals who were folate deficient were 3.5 times more likely to develop dementia. What’s more surprising is that those who were not folate deficient but had low folate measures were also at significantly increased dementia risk. To make sure you get sufficient folate, make asparagus a frequent addition to your meals since one cup of these green spears will fulfill nearly 66% of your daily folate needs.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Other great sources of folate include citrus fruits, beans (be sure to sprout them to maximize their nutrients and enhance absorption by the body), broccoli, cauliflower, beets, lentils and leafy green vegetables such as spinach and turnip greens.

5. Wild Salmon

  • Brain Food Facts:According to a study conducted by Tufts University in Boston, subjects who consumed an average of three servings of oily fish a week had almost 50 percent lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. These individuals had significantly higher levels of omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid in the blood than those who took less fish in their diets. And salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids as well as other important nutrients such as vitamin D and B12 that can help to prevent neurodegenerative disorders.But, as wild caught salmons, frozen or canned, generally contain more omega-3, less omega-6 and fewer toxins, you’re better off buying the wild version whenever possible. Aim to eat at least two to three servings of oily fish each week to supply your body with inflammation-fighting compounds. If you’re concerned about environmental toxins such as PCB in seafood, you can also consider taking whole fish oil supplement derived from wild salmon.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Anchovies and sardines are also very good sources of omega-3 fats. For people who don’t eat fish, walnuts, flaxseeds and dark green leafy vegetables are rich in plant-based omega-3 precursor, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). But they lack eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the two primary omega-3’s. Although technically ALA is converted by the body to EPA and DHA, in reality, the conversion rate is very low (only about one to two percent) and is further reduced if your omega-6 intake is high. So relying solely on walnuts, flaxseeds and dark green leafy vegetables may not provide your body with adequate omega-3 fats. In this case, you can boost your omega-3 intake either by selecting more EPA and DHA-fortified foods, take vegan omega-3 supplements, or both.

6. Walnut

  • Brain Food Facts:Research by the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging suggested that a moderate, but not high, diet of walnuts helped improve motor and cognitive skills in older rodents. The experts believed that a combination of polyphenols, omega-3 fats and other bioactive substances in walnut is responsible for this beneficial effect.But more is not necessarily good. The study discovered that mice fed on a walnut diet equivalent to a human eating more than 1 ounce of walnuts, or about seven to nine walnuts, a day actually displayed lower long-term memory skills.This may be due to the high omega-6 content of walnut. Although this brain-like nut is high in alpha-linolenic acid, it’s even richer in linoleic acid, an omega-6 essential fatty acid. Linoleic acid could lead to more inflammatory compounds being created and less anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats in the body when the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio is out of balanced.Alternative Foods for the Brain:

    Though the exact mechanism of how walnut improves cognitive function is unclear, most doctors and nutritionists recommend eating a wide range of food, including nuts. So don’t stop at walnuts. Each day, grab and enjoy a handful of mixed nuts, dried fruits and seeds — like hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, raisins, dried cranberries and blueberries — to get a spectrum of health-boosting nutrients each day.

7. Cherry

  • Brain Food Facts:Scientists found that the antioxidant compounds, anthocyanins, which give cherries their bright red color possess anti-inflammatory properties that could work like pain medications such as Vioxx and Celebrex, but without the nasty side effects. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs can cause adverse effects, some of which are severe like stomach bleeding and heart attack, especially among the elderly. But cherries do not irritate the stomach the way manufactured drugs do and they also contain compounds that keep platelets in the blood from clumping together.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Berries like blueberries, raspberries and strawberries are jam-packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory phytochemicals that help to reduce brain inflammation and brain oxidative stress, both of which have been associated with dementia and Alzheimer’s.

8. Turmeric

  • Brain Food Facts:Plaques in the brain are thought to contribute to the degradation of brain cells and lead to Alzheimer’s disease. A study found that curcumin in turmeric is an effective substance that removes plagues from the brain. Turmeric, a top anti-inflammatory food used since ancient times, is commonly used as a spice in curry dishes. Countries with populations that eat curry regularly, such as India, have been observed to report lower rates of dementia. Add this inexpensive, versatile spice into your meals at least once a week to cool inflammation and ward off dementia.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Ginger is a close cousin of turmeric with similar anti-inflammatory properties. Though study on its effect on the brain is limited, ginger’s ability to reduce inflammation may also confer some inhibitory effect on dementia indirectly.

9. Apple

  • Brain Food Facts:There are now even more reasons to take an apple a day. Quercetin, found in abundance in the skins of apples, has been found to protect the brain from damages associated with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in studies conducted by Cornell University. Other studies have also suggested that eating apples may also help reduce the risk of cancer.Alternative Foods for the Brain:Capers, a common ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine, lovage and red onion are also excellent sources of quercetin. Berries like cherries, raspberries and cranberries also contain some but lower amounts of this flavonoid. Article by The Conscious Life

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An Afro-American research study on Alzheimer’s Disease is underway at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University.

The study is being promoted as Keeping Memories Alive. This 2 year, national education and awareness campaign proposes to educate, and motivate to action, more than 12 million Americans through, multiple media outlets and grassroots community-based efforts. By combining the resources and talents of the Alzheimer’s Association, AARP, and research partners, the Keeping Memories Alive Alzheimer’s Project will become an effective model for translating scientific information to the public.

The Keeping Memories Alive Alzheimer’s Project team envisions a proactive and “brain-healthier” world.

African-Americans have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s Disease. To participate in the research study, you must be

  • African-American
  • 60 years of age or older
  • Male or Female
  • With or without memory problems

Finding genes that cause Alzheimer’s Disease and leaning how they interact with factors such as diet and the environment will lead to improved tools for diagnosis and better treatments for the disease.

To enroll, please call the Alzheimer’s Study Coordinators toll free at 1-888-248-2808 or 1-877-686-6444

What are the study facts

  • Participation is voluntary
  • All information is confidential
  • There is no cost to you
  • Your current healthcare or insurance will not be affected
  • Travel is not necessary
  • One may withdraw at any time
  • Research progress will be sent to study participants in periodic newsletters

Additional resources

 

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