Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘insulin’

My beagle who is  10 years old lost his eye sight a few weeks ago.  I noticed  he lost weight and before going blind, would open his eyes wider. When his energy level was low and his tail wouldn’t wag, I took him to the doctor and they kept him for 2 nights because he was so sick.

Moby was diagnosed with diabetes and had a blood sugar level of 800, norm being 80-150. Weight loss occurred because insulin was needed to feed the cells much-needed blood sugar or glucose. When the cells aren’t being fed, they steal nourishment from fat cells, therefore the weight loss. Other signs are;

  • increased thirst
  • frequent urination
  • depression
  • blindness due to cataracts

Since there is no cure for Diabetes, ongoing treatment is required of the owner. The doctor packed up several syringes, a couple of viles of insulin and instructions. I was nervous about giving Moby shots, but that feeling was short-lived. I had to learn fast, for 3 other doggies were very curious at injection time.

Moby receives 6 units twice a day (12 hours apart) and supplies are kept in the refrigerator. Below is the type of insulin prescribed, but also suggested Humulin N would work too. Insulin can be picked up at almost any pet supply store.

One syringe will last for a week.

Fill the syringe with air, same as the dosage. Moby’s dose is 6 units, so 6 units of air are pulled into the needle.

Take the syringe and insert into insulin vile. We are inserting 6 units of air in order to extract 6 units of insulin. This will keep air bubbles out.

Turn upside down and pull down the units needed.

Take your syringe and bring a treat to distract. Works every time. I am giving Moby his shot on the upper area of his back. Just pull some loose skin, stick and shoot. Nothing to it, just make sure there isn’t a wet spot, which means needle was not inserted properly.

After 2 weeks of insulin injections, Moby’s blood was tested and was a much better number of 200.

Some causes of pet diabetes are; genetic disposition, obesity, poor diet, stress or abnormal hormones. This is a manageable condition and Moby’s tail is happily wagging again.

Read Full Post »