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Posts Tagged ‘North Carolina’

Meet Sparky, a wonderful young Chihuahua puppy about one year old. Notice his eyes have a touch of blue.

Sparky is very good with children

and other pets (Willie is also adoptable)

He will let you know he needs to go outside by walking in a circle, yes, he does this. Sparky also likes dressing up for the holiday’s.

Sparky will be one of the adoptable pets at the “Celebrate Mother Earth” event April 16th.

Sparky deserves a forever home. With his adoption, we are able to work with other rescue Chihuahua dogs, improving their chances of adoption in the Piedmont Triad Area. Open your home and your hearts to a new family member.

When you have made your adoption, schedule your pet portrait session with Rhonda Lester, welcoming your new member.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal

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The Burns Hill Neighborhood Watch Association has taken the initiative making their community a safer place for families raising  children and the elder population and improve the quality of life. A Commitment to Community Award Dinner recognized outstanding members and noted “all” were deserving of the awards.

 

The president, Jerry C. Mingo was very appreciative of all community members taking action to ensure a neighborhood, safe to come home to.

Even Boy Scout Troup 6 participated.

Pastor, Annie Baker, Chaplin said a few words and song.

We had live entertainment from Brenda Bey-Vocal Xpressions, just beautiful.

Angela Howard-Health Coach of Take Shape for Life was a sponsor, member of Burns Hill and Mistress of Ceremony.

Awards were given out for

  • Perfect Attendance
  • Good Neighbor Award
  • Unsung Hero Award

One of the sponsors of the evening- Call on Red, computer repair.

Centerpieces were green and “Green”, created by

Subjects Discussed were

  • Children’s curfew
  • Slumlords -homes not boarded up properly, contributing to other issues
  • Promiscuous behavior
  • Selling of illegal substances
  • America’s Night Out Against Crime
  • Cleaning up the neighborhood
  • Community gardening

Pride and taking ownership and responsibility was noted,  the building blocks of strong community.  Burns Hill Community Neighborhood is working together with local representatives, moving mountains for the good of the people.  What if all neighborhoods acted ?

Great Job Burns Hill!

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North Carolina is ranked among the highest in the nation regarding obesity, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. In general, states in the West and New England rank lowest in the fattest states rankings, while states in the South and the Rust Belt tend to rank highest. 57% of North Carolina adults are overweight or obese.

Some factors causing weight gain and obesity are

  • Lack of energy balance
  • Pregnancy
  • Emotional
  • Inactive Lifestyle
  • Environment
  • Health conditions
  • Family genes
  • Medicines
  • Smoking
  • Age
  • Lack of Sleep to name a few

Could we, as North Carolinians change those statistics?

Let’s Fight the Fat Stat and Learn to Live Lean and Mean with our local resources (and they are not difficult to find)

Angela Howard-Health Coach with Take Shape for Life addresses  issues on an individual basis. Her motto, “There is no 1 solution to weight loss, it is a combination.” Angela has personally lost 212 pounds and works with clients who desire loosing 2-5 pounds per week, taking the healthy route.

Below is a picture of Angela and her husband, both at least 200 pounds over-weight. An unfortunate reality was the diagnosis of early onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, motivating her decision to change her life.

Angela provides workshops regarding health and wellness

What foods to select, how to prepare, are supplements needed, exercise implementation or other activities to improve quality of life are all examined. It is a known fact, people trying to lose weight with the help of a coach or another trained health professional, do so faster and also keep the weight off. They act as your support system while you walk the journey to a healthier lifestyle. Angela can be reached for questions at, 336.301.9321. Fight the Fat!

If you have been declined for health insurance, or feel you may not be accepted, there are other alternatives, call Melody Anderson of Chadwick Insurance Group, LLC for assistance. There is no charge for consultations.

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The Ted Williams story is ongoing and we hope he pulls through his personal challenges.  Most stories regarding the homeless are not  typical screenplay material, rather of a child or parent struggling with living life the best they know how.

 A local Greensboro, NC man was featured on the cover of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal’s first issue in February 2010. Through this online link, Michele of Chosenfast website, who reports on our local homeless community, informed us of his accidental death. Larry’s obituary was sadly posted without a photograph.

GREENSBORO — A pedestrian crossing eastbound Interstate 40 on Tuesday night was struck by an SUV and later died at Moses Cone Hospital, according to a news release.

On Wednesday, police identified the man as Larry Wayne McCraw, 40, of Greensboro.

He was hit by a 2002 Ford Explorer just before 6 p.m. Tuesday. The car was driven by Gail Hill Roper, 58, of Whitsett. She was not injured.

Police are still investigating the crash.

The wreck stalled traffic on eastbound I-40 near the Martin Luther King Jr. Drive exit. All lanes have reopened.

When Mr. McCraw’s family posted his obituary, we signed his guest book in hopes of connecting with living family members. His cousin reached out to us in a matter of hours. She resides less than 2 miles from our office and was very appreciative of any pictures of her nephew. After meeting with her, we realized 3 generations of Larry’s family members graduated with ours. We had a connection far deeper than a weekly hand wave.

I saw Larry quite often and he was not camera-shy  and when presented with his photograph on the front cover, said, “Wow, I am famous”. Not to the extent of Ted Williams, but more humbly. The mere connection to Mr. Larry Wayne McCraw was his sweet and polite nature every time a care packet of food was given to him. These care packets are little acts of kindness when one is unsure of why they are there, what they are doing or will do with money given to them.

Rest in Peace Larry Wayne McCraw

Read how our local painter, William Mangum has helped the homeless community by utilizing his talents developing the  Honor Card Program.

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The Brain Injury Association of NC  hosted a Caregiver’s Appreciation Morning Out in High Point, NC. Some factors contributing to brain injury include

  • Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Stroke
  • Car Accidents (texting, drunk driving)
  • Falls
  • Trauma from Military Explosions
  • Brain Aneurysms
  • We learned a young girl wearing glass hair accessories fell and her skull received significant damage, changing her life indefinitely

♥ Note-Brain Injuries are usually not diagnosed within the homeless population. We may see them staggering as if under the influence of a foreign substance, but could be a result of tramatic brain injury.

It is called a Disease, but with no cure.

Peggy Nelson, Kitty Barringer, Susan Fewell, and Yvonne Josephson, CRRN or HP REgional Hospital orgainzed the Love Journey of Caregiving. There were personal and heartwarming stories shared, humor, resources, and caregiver nominations, along with several door prizes given away.

Traumatic Brain Injury Statistics

The meeting was very informational and enlightening. Tuesday February 1st at 7pm, Millis Regional Health Education Center with host an event for all Survivors, Family Members, Friends, and Professionals recognizing the Brain Injury Alliance. More details, contact John at 336.887.0745.

Everyone walked away with a copy of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal and we were glad to be a part of the luncheon and help promote this Hidden Disability.

Angela Howard spoke on the challenges of caregiving. Her mother endured a stroke and her husband diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimers Disease. The importance of health was reiterated and benefits no one if the caregiver does not surround themselves with caring and compassionate family and friends.

 

WALK & ROLL-athon Burmil Park April 16th, details here, 2011. Additional information will be provided within the March issue of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal.

The Brain Injury Association of NC is partnering with Camp Carefree September 16-18th, 2011 in Stokesdale, NC.  Sons of Italy has partnered with Camp Carefree, a hidden local treasure.

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Options for Bereaved Families

 Many changes have come about regarding the death industry, including how to mourn or celebrate a deceased family member or friend. The National Funeral Directors Association 2007 study showed that 23% of the respondents desired a very personalized funeral.

The Emerald Event Center is a facility truly celebrating a loved one because of the compassion, care and uniqueness they offer our community; one significant factor being great value meeting individual budgets, seating anywhere from 100- 500. Because of the spatial options, memorial and funeral services could be held in the same room for a more intimate setting, as opposed to a church and a funeral home.

The covered patio can be easily decorated and offers an outdoor sitting area.

Most of the decor is offered, in-house by Emerald.

 

The Emerald Event center is also the home of Create a Cake Catering, where fresh, comfort food is offered. In the past, the center held an Irish memorial service, given by their priest and meal where guests were fed favorite foods made from recipes family members provided for the cooking staff. A full bar was offered as well, because an ABC license is held by the center. A radio, Irish music cd’s, mementoes and personal stories about the gentleman were exchanged in a private room, where even the children felt comfortable to exchange memories of their Uncle. A Celebrate Life cake was also personalized with a picture and mementoes dear to him.

 

Beautiful Altars can be created.

For a beloved Veteran

For bereaved families of pregnancy and infant loss, the facility may be an option if the couple does not belong to a church or out – of- town family members will arrive at a later date. Angelversary cakes can be personalized to reflect the baby’s gender, nursery theme, zodiac sign, and birthstone, to recognize and honor the child. The Emerald Event Center will also be able to accommodate the last-minute decision to use their facility. Click here, how to help plan for baby loss.

Unnecessary driving miles can be avoided, by having the service, memorial, and meal in one place. If you would like to take a tour of the center, call 336.691.000.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal

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A Healthly Place has written a wonderful article regarding support for bereaved family members and friends.

Our local resource, Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal believes strongly in the power of listening to those suffering great sadness after their losses. Stories are shared within the journal for our community to somewhat walk in their shoes while educating ourselves for similar experiences we may face in the future.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal is funded by generous advertisers and those wanting to recognize a loved on within the journal, upon the  Quilt of Remembrance page. We are on our 12th month and have not profited and need your help, just to continue printing this resource.  We are more interested in reporting on those wanting to share their stories as part of their healing process, than solicit advertisers. Read past journals online.

How can I help an adult friend or family member deal with the death of a loved one?  Someone you know may be experiencing grief – perhaps the loss of a loved one, perhaps another type of loss – and you want to help. The fear of making things worse may encourage you to do nothing. Yet you do not wish to appear to be uncaring. Remember that it is better to try to do something, inadequate as you may feel, than to do nothing at all. Don’t attempt to sooth or stifle the emotions of the bereaved. Tears and anger are an important part of the healing process. Grief is not a sign of weakness. It is the result of a strong relationship and deserves the honor of strong emotion. When supporting someone in their grief the most important thing is to simply listen. Grief is a very confusing process, expressions of logic are lost on the griever. The question “tell me how you are feeling” followed by a patient and attentive ear will seem like a major blessing to the grief stricken. Be present, reveal your caring, listen. Your desire is to assist your friend down the path of healing. They will find their own way down that path, but they need a helping hand, an assurance that they are not entirely alone on their journey. It does not matter that you do not understand the details, your presence is enough. Risk a visit, it need not be long. The mourner may need time to be alone but will surely appreciate the effort you made to visit. Do some act of kindness. There are always ways to help. Run errands, answer the phone, prepare meals, mow the lawn, care for the children, shop for groceries, meet incoming planes or provide lodging for out of town relatives. The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.
How can I deal with the death of a loved one?

Bereavement is a powerful, life-changing experience that most people find overwhelming the first time. Although grief is a natural process of human life, most of us are not inherently able to manage it alone. At the same time, others are often unable to provide aid or insight because of discomfort with the situation and the desire to avoid making things worse. The following passage explains how some of our “normal” assumptions about grief may make it more difficult to deal with.

Five Assumptions That May Complicate
  1. Life prepares us for loss.
  2. Family and friends will understand.
  3. The bereaved should be finished with their grief within one year or something is wrong.
  4. Along with the end of grief’s pain comes the end of the memories.
  5. The bereaved should grieve alone.Provided courtesy of Jack Redden, CCE, M.A., President; John Redden, M.S., Vice President, Cemetery-Mortuary Consultants Inc., Memphis, Tennessee  More is learned about loss through experience than through preparation. Living may not provide preparation for survival. Handling grief resulting from the death of a loved one is a process that takes hard work. The fortunate experience of a happy life may not have built a complete foundation for handling loss. Healing is built through perseverance, support and understanding. The bereaved need others: Find others who are empathetic. 
     
    How can I help an adult friend or family member deal with the death of a loved one?
     

     

     
     
     

    Someone you know may be experiencing grief – perhaps the loss of a loved one, perhaps another type of loss – and you want to help. The fear of making things worse may encourage you to do nothing. Yet you do not wish to appear to be uncaring. Remember that it is better to try to do something, inadequate as you may feel, than to do nothing at all. Don’t attempt to sooth or stifle the emotions of the griever. Tears and anger are an important part of the healing process. Grief is not a sign of weakness. It is the result of a strong relationship and deserves the honor of strong emotion. When supporting someone in their grief the most important thing is to simply listen. Grief is a very confusing process, expressions of logic are lost on the griever. The question “tell me how you are feeling” followed by a patient and attentive ear will seem like a major blessing to the grief stricken. Be present, reveal your caring, listen. Your desire is to assist your friend down the path of healing. They will find their own way down that path, but they need a helping hand, an assurance that they are not entirely alone on their journey. It does not matter that you do not understand the details, your presence is enough. Risk a visit, it need not be long. The mourner may need time to be alone but will surely appreciate the effort you made to visit. Do some act of kindness. There are always ways to help. Run errands, answer the phone, prepare meals, mow the lawn, care for the children, shop for groceries, meet incoming planes or provide lodging for out of town relatives. The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.

    How can I deal with the death of a loved one?

     

     
     
     
     

    Bereavement is a powerful, life-changing experience that most people find overwhelming the first time. Although grief is a natural process of human life, most of us are not inherently able to manage it alone. At the same time, others are often unable to provide aid or insight because of discomfort with the situation and the desire to avoid making things worse. The following passage explains how some of our “normal” assumptions about grief may make it more difficult to deal with.

    Five Assumptions That May Complicate

     

    Life prepares us for loss.
    After the funeral service is over the bereaved may find themselves alone. They may feel as though they are going crazy, painfully uncertain in their world of thoughts and emotions. The bereaved begin to feel normal again when the experience is shared with others who have lost a loved one. Then, in reaching out, the focus of life becomes forward. The bereaved need others: Find others who are experienced.
      

    Provided courtesy of Jack Redden, CCE, M.A., President; John Redden, M.S., Vice President, Cemetery-Mortuary Consultants Inc., Memphis, Tennessee

     

     
     
     
     

     

    More is learned about loss through experience than through preparation. Living may not provide preparation for survival. Handling grief resulting from the death of a loved one is a process that takes hard work. The fortunate experience of a happy life may not have built a complete foundation for handling loss. Healing is built through perseverance, support and understanding. The bereaved need others: Find others who are empathetic.

    Family and friends will understand.

     

    If a spouse dies children lose a parent, a sibling loses a sibling, a parent loses a child and a friend loses a friend. Only one loses a spouse. Each response is different according to the relationship. Family and friends may not be capable of understanding each other thoroughly. Consider the story of Job’s grief in the Bible. Job’s wife did not understand his grief. His friends did their best work the first week when they just sat and did not speak. It was when they began to share their judgements of Job and his life that they complicated Job’s grief. Allowance must be made so that grief may be experienced and processed over time. The bereaved need others: Find others who are accepting.
     
     

    The bereaved should be finished with their grief within one year or something is wrong.

     

    During the first year the bereaved will experience one of everything for the first time alone: anniversaries, birthdays, occasions, etc. Therefore grief will last for at least one year. The cliche, “the healing hands of time,” does not go far enough to explain what must take place. The key to handling grief is in what work is done over time. It takes time and work to decide what to do and where to go with the new and changed life that is left behind. The bereaved need others: Find others who are patient.
     
     

    Along with the end of grief’s pain comes the end of the memories.

     

    At times, the bereaved may embrace the pain of grief believing it is all they have left. The lingering close bond to the deceased is sometimes thought to maintain the memories while, in fact, just the opposite is true. In learning to let go and live a new and changed life memories tend to come back more clearly. Growth and healing comes in learning to enjoy memories. The bereaved need others: Find new friends and interests.
     
     

    The bereaved should grieve alone.

     

     

After the funeral service is over the bereaved may find themselves alone. They may feel as though they are going crazy, painfully uncertain in their world of thoughts and emotions. The bereaved begin to feel normal again when the experience is shared with others who have lost a loved one. Then, in reaching out, the focus of life becomes forward. The bereaved need others: Find others who are experienced. At times, the bereaved may embrace the pain of grief believing it is all they have left. The lingering close bond to the deceased is sometimes thought to maintain the memories while, in fact, just the opposite is true. In learning to let go and live a new and changed life memories tend to come back more clearly. Growth and healing comes in learning to enjoy memories. The bereaved need others: Find new friends and interests. During the first year the bereaved will experience one of everything for the first time alone: anniversaries, birthdays, angelveraries, occasions, etc. Therefore grief will last for at least one year. The cliche, “the healing hands of time,” does not go far enough to explain what must take place. The key to handling grief is in what work is done over time. It takes time and work to decide what to do and where to go with the new and changed life that is left behind. The bereaved need others: Find others who are patient. If a spouse dies children lose a parent, a sibling loses a sibling, a parent loses a child and a friend loses a friend. Only one loses a spouse. Each response is different according to the relationship. Family and friends may not be capable of understanding each other thoroughly. Consider the story of Job’s grief in the Bible. Job’s wife did not understand his grief. His friends did their best work the first week when they just sat and did not speak. It was when they began to share their judgements of Job and his life that they complicated Job’s grief. Allowance must be made so that grief may be experienced and processed over time. The bereaved need others: Find others who are accepting.

 

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