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Posts Tagged ‘nursing home’

NFL star, Terrell Owens is grateful of his stardom and attributes fame to his grandmother. Because she raised Terrell, she was the one responsible for his love of the sport.

Alice Black was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease during Terrell’s first NFL season, 14 years ago. Mr. Owens stated, “It’s like she is dying a slow death.” Unfortunately, his grandmother will never know how he has thrived at the sport and  no longer recognizes her grandson.

Terrell spreads awareness of Alzheimer’s Disease by participating in Memory Walks to raise money for reasearch. He has also appeared in several public announcements regarding the disease. Several years ago he testified before Congress to increase  federal funding for research.

At the ago of 76, Alice Black is now residing in a nursing home down south, where her communication skills have diminished .

Terrell wishes very much his grandmother could share his achievements with him and to thank her.

Article by WebMD

An Afro-American Alzheimer Research Study is being conducted at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Keeping Memories Alive. They are looking for participants, click here.

If you would like a loved one honored on our Quilt of Remembrance, in full color print within Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal, please click here. We will gladly mail copies to you and your family.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal

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 Alzheimer’s Disease is on the rise with someone being diagnosed every 70 seconds. Families are choosing to keep loved ones at home, hiring in home care agencies to help or

choosing a reputable facility specializing in Alzheimer Care.

One of the top Alzheimer Care facilities in the Buffalo, NY area is Harris Hill Nursing Facility, not because of one of my family members resides here, but the various activities, parties and projects offered.

For Alzheimer patients who are aware of their surroundings and have the desire to feel needed, activities are crucial on a daily basis.

Activities range from tactile (papercrafting, repetitive projects), audio (singing, listening to story-telling or music), physical (gardening or house keeping). Depending on the patients level of function, there is an activity for them, even if for only a few minutes per day.

 

When I visit Harris Hill, one particular woman with Alzheimer’s Disease is always carrying her baby doll in her arms being so attentive with such love in her eyes.

 

The parties and events are long processes with staff moving very slow. It is not the destination it is the journey. High strung people like myself have to slow down and enjoy the talk, dance and smiles of the residents who think they have known you all of their lives.

 

Find out what kind of activities are offered when you are selecting your loved ones new home. The disease may bring out new personality traits and hidden talents, which are just a moment away of being revealed to you.

Alzheimer’s Disease facilities in the Piedmont Triad Area can schedule gardening activities with Diana Digs Dirt

of papercrafting projects with Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal

We are looking for a monthly papercrafting location in the Greensboro, NC for a workshop to meet on the 3rd Friday of the month from 5-11PM. This would be added exposure for your facility where workshops will be photographed and posted on Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal’s Blog. The workshops will reach out to community members wanting to learn how to compose keepsakes of loved ones, pets or baby’s gone too soon in the form of journal books, scrapbooks, collages, cards and more.

Email- Diana (@) justacloudaway.com to schedule activities

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After 12 years with Alzheimer’s Disease, this was the year Gram didn’t remember me when I visited her at the nursing home. My father said, “Mom, do you remember this girl?” She looked at me and said no. The toughest part was enduring her playful laugh as I sobbed in my hands. She was confused and amused as to why this strange girl was crying. I had a feeling this would be the dreaded moment because the instant we locked eyes, there was no spark of love, memories or the faintest feeling of familiarity. I was just another face.

Gram and I were close because I lived in her upstairs apartment, while she resided in the lower flat, for a few years. This was a symbiotic relationship because Gramps passed, leaving her alone and this gave me an opportunity to experienced some independence.

We spent a great deal of time together and became friends. She would often invite me to lunch (on her) and after some time, were regulars at Albert’s, Denny’s and Casa de Pizza.

When Gramps entered the nursing home, my Grandmother rearranged her schedule to care for him and he was not the easiest husband. She would help anyone who needed it and sincerely would give you the shirt off her back.

I loved living with her because she was never in a bad mood (or pretended). She would yell up to me, “Diana, do you want a cup of coffee?” Instant was her favorite, probably because she did not want to remember how to work a coffee maker. It was a nasty cup of coffee, but the company was great. Whenever I am offered an instant cup of coffee now, I gladly accept and memories of Gram flood my brain and the cup is savory and tolerable.

Gram always slipped me some “gas” money, bought  jewelry from the local department store or cooked hot meals for me, a poor college student. I miss those days and there will be nothing that comes close to replacing them.

I wear her jewelry with pride and share the story of her when these gems are questioned and admired.

Gram is a beautiful person inside and out.

 I sometimes think she is now living the life she should have all along, because of how Alzheimer’s has changed her. Unfortunately, Gram had a few regrets in life and would have never been caught dead wearing the hat below. I think Alzheimer’s Disease has given her a bit of freedom and playfulness she never felt comfortable expressing without the disease.

10 years ago, Gram was in the early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease during our wedding. I know she was a bit confused, but looked lovely. She knew how to play it off by saying, “Hi honey” or “Yes, Yes, I remember you”, but never did state their name.

If in the triad area, we will informally gather to papercraft memories, more info here

I created an Alzheimer’s Awareness Ribbon (magnet) for my grandmother. The ribbon color is purple, hence the purple cording around the edges and the purple paper in the background.

There are so many ways to create meaningful keepsakes of those we love dearly.

I love you Gram…..

Read my mother’s perspective…

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