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Posts Tagged ‘sadness’

The Ted Williams story is ongoing and we hope he pulls through his personal challenges.  Most stories regarding the homeless are not  typical screenplay material, rather of a child or parent struggling with living life the best they know how.

 A local Greensboro, NC man was featured on the cover of Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal’s first issue in February 2010. Through this online link, Michele of Chosenfast website, who reports on our local homeless community, informed us of his accidental death. Larry’s obituary was sadly posted without a photograph.

GREENSBORO — A pedestrian crossing eastbound Interstate 40 on Tuesday night was struck by an SUV and later died at Moses Cone Hospital, according to a news release.

On Wednesday, police identified the man as Larry Wayne McCraw, 40, of Greensboro.

He was hit by a 2002 Ford Explorer just before 6 p.m. Tuesday. The car was driven by Gail Hill Roper, 58, of Whitsett. She was not injured.

Police are still investigating the crash.

The wreck stalled traffic on eastbound I-40 near the Martin Luther King Jr. Drive exit. All lanes have reopened.

When Mr. McCraw’s family posted his obituary, we signed his guest book in hopes of connecting with living family members. His cousin reached out to us in a matter of hours. She resides less than 2 miles from our office and was very appreciative of any pictures of her nephew. After meeting with her, we realized 3 generations of Larry’s family members graduated with ours. We had a connection far deeper than a weekly hand wave.

I saw Larry quite often and he was not camera-shy  and when presented with his photograph on the front cover, said, “Wow, I am famous”. Not to the extent of Ted Williams, but more humbly. The mere connection to Mr. Larry Wayne McCraw was his sweet and polite nature every time a care packet of food was given to him. These care packets are little acts of kindness when one is unsure of why they are there, what they are doing or will do with money given to them.

Rest in Peace Larry Wayne McCraw

Read how our local painter, William Mangum has helped the homeless community by utilizing his talents developing the  Honor Card Program.

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 Terms to be Familiar with when Preplanning a Funeral

Archival Photographsprinted on high quality paper, fade and water-resistant, ideal for outdoor memory gardens.

Bio-Degradable Urn-non-toxic and will decompose over time without harming the earth

Body Donation-donation of whole body for medical research or education

Body Transport-NC does not require the deceased loved one to be transported by the funeral homes

Budget-what are you willing to pay for the entire funeral or memorial service?

Burial Interment by burial in a grave

Burial Liner Outer burial container for a casket, a minimum requirement by most cemeteries

Body Donation-donation of whole body for medical research or education

Burial Vault Protective outer burial container for a casket

Casket The box-like container the body is placed in

Cemetery/graveyard Private, military or community grounds for burying the dead

Columbarium An arrangement of niches to hold cremation urns, usually fronted by glass, bronze, marble or granite and may be located either indoors or outdoors

Cremated remains Remains recovered following cremation

Cremation The reduction, by direct flame, of the body to its basic elements. Some facilities will provide this free of charge for early pregnancy losses and stillbirths.

Crypt Cubicle designed to contain a casket usually in a mausoleum

Eco-Eternity Forest-are undisturbed forest preservations providing ecologically friendly and peaceful resting places for cremated ashes. Ashes are placed in biodegradable urns and buried at the roots of mature trees. Over time, the roots will absorb the nutrients and create a living memorial

Eco-friendly options-embalming fluids are not used, cremation is not used, respecting nature with little harm like burial at sea

Embalm The preserving and sanitizing of the body. The state of NC does not require this, dried ice is another alternative

Funeral Ceremony A service or rite, religious or non-religious, held at a funeral home, church or elsewhere with the body present

Graveside Ceremony-A service or rite, religious or non-religious, held at the cemetery with casket (interment) or urn present (internment)

Green Burials–  any one of a number of options that doesn’t leave a body in a metal casket in the ground for hundreds of years, with minimal adverse impact on the earth

Green caskets-100% biodegradable caskets handcrafted from pine harvested exclusively from the sustainable forests,contain no metal nor toxins whatsoever

Interred-to place in a tomb or grave

Mausoleum A building consisting of crypts (entombment)

Memorial Artwork Bronze sculpture, or other fine art, designed for the purpose of honoring the memories of a life lived.

 

Memory Garden-any designed outdoor residential space for reflection, with or without ashes of loved one. Memory Gardens can also be developed on Campuses, Churches and other Institutions.

 

Memorial Ceremony A gathering of family and friends (religious or non-religious) held at a funeral home, church or other venue, without the body present. It takes place after burial or cremation

 

Memorial Tree-purchased by family to recognize loved ones past and planting in a residential landscape, church, or in the city (Greensboro Beautiful Memorial Tree Program).

 

Mowable Groundcover-small outdoor, non-invasive, groundcover  plants adding color to cemetery plots/gravesites and withstand mowing without damaging.

 

Niche The space for cremated remains in a columbarium, mausoleum or other structure

Obituary-is a notice or announcement of a person’s death, often with a short account of their life. It is often the first thing many people read in the news each day and may be the last word written about a person’s life. These are then submitted to newspapers, online or Just a Cloud Away, Inc.™ Journal

 

Open Casket An option available for viewing of the deceased.

Organ Donation-registering certain organs to be donated after death

Pre-planning Funerals-discussing end of life arrangements with close family or a chosen funeral director

Remains Usually referring to the body but may include cremated remains.

Urn Vault Outer container for urn or cremated remains, a requirement by some cemeteries. Perfume viles are sometimes used when the loss is early in pregnancy.

Urn The vase or container used for cremated remains

 Viewing/Visitation An option available for viewing the body, either private, family only or public, scheduled prior to services at a funeral home, church or in a home

Our loved ones are just a cloud away…………..

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A Healthly Place has written a wonderful article regarding support for bereaved family members and friends.

Our local resource, Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal believes strongly in the power of listening to those suffering great sadness after their losses. Stories are shared within the journal for our community to somewhat walk in their shoes while educating ourselves for similar experiences we may face in the future.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal is funded by generous advertisers and those wanting to recognize a loved on within the journal, upon the  Quilt of Remembrance page. We are on our 12th month and have not profited and need your help, just to continue printing this resource.  We are more interested in reporting on those wanting to share their stories as part of their healing process, than solicit advertisers. Read past journals online.

How can I help an adult friend or family member deal with the death of a loved one?  Someone you know may be experiencing grief – perhaps the loss of a loved one, perhaps another type of loss – and you want to help. The fear of making things worse may encourage you to do nothing. Yet you do not wish to appear to be uncaring. Remember that it is better to try to do something, inadequate as you may feel, than to do nothing at all. Don’t attempt to sooth or stifle the emotions of the bereaved. Tears and anger are an important part of the healing process. Grief is not a sign of weakness. It is the result of a strong relationship and deserves the honor of strong emotion. When supporting someone in their grief the most important thing is to simply listen. Grief is a very confusing process, expressions of logic are lost on the griever. The question “tell me how you are feeling” followed by a patient and attentive ear will seem like a major blessing to the grief stricken. Be present, reveal your caring, listen. Your desire is to assist your friend down the path of healing. They will find their own way down that path, but they need a helping hand, an assurance that they are not entirely alone on their journey. It does not matter that you do not understand the details, your presence is enough. Risk a visit, it need not be long. The mourner may need time to be alone but will surely appreciate the effort you made to visit. Do some act of kindness. There are always ways to help. Run errands, answer the phone, prepare meals, mow the lawn, care for the children, shop for groceries, meet incoming planes or provide lodging for out of town relatives. The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.
How can I deal with the death of a loved one?

Bereavement is a powerful, life-changing experience that most people find overwhelming the first time. Although grief is a natural process of human life, most of us are not inherently able to manage it alone. At the same time, others are often unable to provide aid or insight because of discomfort with the situation and the desire to avoid making things worse. The following passage explains how some of our “normal” assumptions about grief may make it more difficult to deal with.

Five Assumptions That May Complicate
  1. Life prepares us for loss.
  2. Family and friends will understand.
  3. The bereaved should be finished with their grief within one year or something is wrong.
  4. Along with the end of grief’s pain comes the end of the memories.
  5. The bereaved should grieve alone.Provided courtesy of Jack Redden, CCE, M.A., President; John Redden, M.S., Vice President, Cemetery-Mortuary Consultants Inc., Memphis, Tennessee  More is learned about loss through experience than through preparation. Living may not provide preparation for survival. Handling grief resulting from the death of a loved one is a process that takes hard work. The fortunate experience of a happy life may not have built a complete foundation for handling loss. Healing is built through perseverance, support and understanding. The bereaved need others: Find others who are empathetic. 
     
    How can I help an adult friend or family member deal with the death of a loved one?
     

     

     
     
     

    Someone you know may be experiencing grief – perhaps the loss of a loved one, perhaps another type of loss – and you want to help. The fear of making things worse may encourage you to do nothing. Yet you do not wish to appear to be uncaring. Remember that it is better to try to do something, inadequate as you may feel, than to do nothing at all. Don’t attempt to sooth or stifle the emotions of the griever. Tears and anger are an important part of the healing process. Grief is not a sign of weakness. It is the result of a strong relationship and deserves the honor of strong emotion. When supporting someone in their grief the most important thing is to simply listen. Grief is a very confusing process, expressions of logic are lost on the griever. The question “tell me how you are feeling” followed by a patient and attentive ear will seem like a major blessing to the grief stricken. Be present, reveal your caring, listen. Your desire is to assist your friend down the path of healing. They will find their own way down that path, but they need a helping hand, an assurance that they are not entirely alone on their journey. It does not matter that you do not understand the details, your presence is enough. Risk a visit, it need not be long. The mourner may need time to be alone but will surely appreciate the effort you made to visit. Do some act of kindness. There are always ways to help. Run errands, answer the phone, prepare meals, mow the lawn, care for the children, shop for groceries, meet incoming planes or provide lodging for out of town relatives. The smallest good deed is better than the grandest good intention.

    How can I deal with the death of a loved one?

     

     
     
     
     

    Bereavement is a powerful, life-changing experience that most people find overwhelming the first time. Although grief is a natural process of human life, most of us are not inherently able to manage it alone. At the same time, others are often unable to provide aid or insight because of discomfort with the situation and the desire to avoid making things worse. The following passage explains how some of our “normal” assumptions about grief may make it more difficult to deal with.

    Five Assumptions That May Complicate

     

    Life prepares us for loss.
    After the funeral service is over the bereaved may find themselves alone. They may feel as though they are going crazy, painfully uncertain in their world of thoughts and emotions. The bereaved begin to feel normal again when the experience is shared with others who have lost a loved one. Then, in reaching out, the focus of life becomes forward. The bereaved need others: Find others who are experienced.
      

    Provided courtesy of Jack Redden, CCE, M.A., President; John Redden, M.S., Vice President, Cemetery-Mortuary Consultants Inc., Memphis, Tennessee

     

     
     
     
     

     

    More is learned about loss through experience than through preparation. Living may not provide preparation for survival. Handling grief resulting from the death of a loved one is a process that takes hard work. The fortunate experience of a happy life may not have built a complete foundation for handling loss. Healing is built through perseverance, support and understanding. The bereaved need others: Find others who are empathetic.

    Family and friends will understand.

     

    If a spouse dies children lose a parent, a sibling loses a sibling, a parent loses a child and a friend loses a friend. Only one loses a spouse. Each response is different according to the relationship. Family and friends may not be capable of understanding each other thoroughly. Consider the story of Job’s grief in the Bible. Job’s wife did not understand his grief. His friends did their best work the first week when they just sat and did not speak. It was when they began to share their judgements of Job and his life that they complicated Job’s grief. Allowance must be made so that grief may be experienced and processed over time. The bereaved need others: Find others who are accepting.
     
     

    The bereaved should be finished with their grief within one year or something is wrong.

     

    During the first year the bereaved will experience one of everything for the first time alone: anniversaries, birthdays, occasions, etc. Therefore grief will last for at least one year. The cliche, “the healing hands of time,” does not go far enough to explain what must take place. The key to handling grief is in what work is done over time. It takes time and work to decide what to do and where to go with the new and changed life that is left behind. The bereaved need others: Find others who are patient.
     
     

    Along with the end of grief’s pain comes the end of the memories.

     

    At times, the bereaved may embrace the pain of grief believing it is all they have left. The lingering close bond to the deceased is sometimes thought to maintain the memories while, in fact, just the opposite is true. In learning to let go and live a new and changed life memories tend to come back more clearly. Growth and healing comes in learning to enjoy memories. The bereaved need others: Find new friends and interests.
     
     

    The bereaved should grieve alone.

     

     

After the funeral service is over the bereaved may find themselves alone. They may feel as though they are going crazy, painfully uncertain in their world of thoughts and emotions. The bereaved begin to feel normal again when the experience is shared with others who have lost a loved one. Then, in reaching out, the focus of life becomes forward. The bereaved need others: Find others who are experienced. At times, the bereaved may embrace the pain of grief believing it is all they have left. The lingering close bond to the deceased is sometimes thought to maintain the memories while, in fact, just the opposite is true. In learning to let go and live a new and changed life memories tend to come back more clearly. Growth and healing comes in learning to enjoy memories. The bereaved need others: Find new friends and interests. During the first year the bereaved will experience one of everything for the first time alone: anniversaries, birthdays, angelveraries, occasions, etc. Therefore grief will last for at least one year. The cliche, “the healing hands of time,” does not go far enough to explain what must take place. The key to handling grief is in what work is done over time. It takes time and work to decide what to do and where to go with the new and changed life that is left behind. The bereaved need others: Find others who are patient. If a spouse dies children lose a parent, a sibling loses a sibling, a parent loses a child and a friend loses a friend. Only one loses a spouse. Each response is different according to the relationship. Family and friends may not be capable of understanding each other thoroughly. Consider the story of Job’s grief in the Bible. Job’s wife did not understand his grief. His friends did their best work the first week when they just sat and did not speak. It was when they began to share their judgements of Job and his life that they complicated Job’s grief. Allowance must be made so that grief may be experienced and processed over time. The bereaved need others: Find others who are accepting.

 

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A new resource for women suffering from medical conditions such as, chemotherapy treatments, alopecia, lupus, thyroid problems, breast cancer, stress had their grand opening to the public January 14, 2011. Undetectable wigs are even suitable for hair loss from genetics and certain medications such as Wellbutrin, with the complete list from WebMD found here. Gastric bypass surgery can also be a factor in the loss of hair, but with a healthy diet, can be minimized. Health coaches are also very beneficial to keep you on track.

The opening was sponsored by Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™Journal and many other resources were present offering their support, products and services.

Much of the conversation took place in the Serenity Garden designed by DianaDigsDirt.

Residential Serenity Gardens are also designed to engage the senses

Melody Anderson of Chadwick Insurance Group-offers the health insurance to meet  your needs and your budget.

Create a Cake Catering dropped off some yummy cookies and in March, will be hosting

 The Location is Emerald Event Center, click here for info

Pamela Thomas of NY Life- investing in life insurance is well spent dollars,  five investment options to avoid recommends Dave Ramsey.

XoCai Chocolate was another treat

Christiana Dyson of Mary Kay Cosmetics (host a party and %10 is dedicated to Breast Cancer Research). Chanel Lace Hair Gallery will provide space at shop if needed.

Angela Howard, Health Coach of Take Shape for Life offers guidance for women regarding a healthy diet and increased quality of living.

Local author, Janet Nestor signed books during the opening.

Katie, owner of The Clean G, offering cleaning products, air deodorizers and room spritzers, non-toxic, safe and organic.

B-Skinney Coffee gave out samples of a low-glycemic delicious cup of joe.

Janet Nestor treated us to complementary energy work sessions and they were greatly appreciated.

Janet has a gift of connecting with deceased family members through her energy work, more info here.

Thank all of you for your time and especially Sharon Ellis-Wiley of Chanel Lace Hair Gallery. Stop in to say hello.

Sharon has set up a small fund women who cannot afford a wig. Make a donation by purchasing a ribbon and write a brief note or your name on a Breast Cancer Awareness Ribbon and hang on tree in the Serenity Garden

 

Gorgeous flowers donated by Harris Teeter

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We all know loved ones who passed on due to this vicious disease and hopefully we also know cancer survivors. What if you were diagnosed with Cancer today? What would you do or say and why is this important?

Live for the moment, seize the day, don’t live with regret, hostility or hatred in your heart.

Please share your answers. Here is feedback from someone who has lost numerous family members from Cancer. I can only imagine the family dynamics from the words in her answer

” I would write individual letters to every friend and family member of how much I love them and how they have made my life beautiful, meaningful and mine. Write your love on paper and mistakes of others in the sand.”     Suzanne

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal

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NFL star, Terrell Owens is grateful of his stardom and attributes fame to his grandmother. Because she raised Terrell, she was the one responsible for his love of the sport.

Alice Black was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease during Terrell’s first NFL season, 14 years ago. Mr. Owens stated, “It’s like she is dying a slow death.” Unfortunately, his grandmother will never know how he has thrived at the sport and  no longer recognizes her grandson.

Terrell spreads awareness of Alzheimer’s Disease by participating in Memory Walks to raise money for reasearch. He has also appeared in several public announcements regarding the disease. Several years ago he testified before Congress to increase  federal funding for research.

At the ago of 76, Alice Black is now residing in a nursing home down south, where her communication skills have diminished .

Terrell wishes very much his grandmother could share his achievements with him and to thank her.

Article by WebMD

An Afro-American Alzheimer Research Study is being conducted at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Keeping Memories Alive. They are looking for participants, click here.

If you would like a loved one honored on our Quilt of Remembrance, in full color print within Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal, please click here. We will gladly mail copies to you and your family.

Just a Cloud Away, Inc. Journal

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The first “Quilt of Remembrance” for Just a Cloud Away, Inc. ™ Journal has been created. We thank all those who have contributed and supported the publication by remembering or honoring a loved one. The paper addresses human interest stories regarding love, loss, healing, hope, grief and memorials.

Many people upon the quilt are from places other than North Carolinians and will be mailed to family and friends wanting copies.

Angelversaries can also be acknowledged for bereaved parents of pregnancy loss. Miscarriages, stillbirths and babies who have passed of SIDS are very much-loved and remembered.

As a kind gesture, businesses can remember an employees loved one or a beloved pet.

The purchase of a quilt square can also be given as a sympathy gift.

The Quilt of Remembrance will be printed within each monthly issue. Please support your paper by remembering a special person who has touched your life.

Please contact us regarding potential stories, click here.

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